amygdala

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amygdala

 [ah-mig´dah-lah]
1. an almond-shaped structure.

a·myg·da·la

, gen. and pl.

a·myg·da·lae

(ă-mig'dă-lă, -lē),
1. The lymphatic tonsils (pharyngeal, palatine, lingual, laryngeal, and tubal).
2. General term used for the amygdaloid body [TA], which is thought to assess and assign emotional valence to somatic, visceral, and olfactory sensory input.
[L. fr. G. amygdalē, almond; in Mediev. & Mod. L., a tonsil]

amygdala

(ə-mĭg′də-lə)
n. pl. amygda·lae (-lē)
Either of two small, almond-shaped masses of gray matter that are part of the limbic system and are located in the temporal lobes of the cerebral hemispheres. Also called amygdaloid nucleus.

a·myg·da·la

, gen. and pl. amygdalae (ă-mig'dă-lă, -lē)
Denoting the cerebellar tonsil, as well as the lymphatic tonsils (pharyngeal, palatine, lingual, laryngeal, and tubal).
[L. fr. G. amygdalē, almond; in Mediev. & Mod. L., a tonsil]

amygdala

An almond-shaped brain nucleus at the front of the temporal lobe. The amygdala is concerned with memory registration.
References in periodicals archive ?
This showed that the rubber hand illusion took much longer to arise in healthy subjects than in the twins with defective amygdalae. Furthermore, a standardized questionnaire showed that women with intact amygdalae had a much weaker sensory delusion than the twins.
The joint hypermobility group had significantly larger amygdalae, with increased gray matter volumes bilaterally, compared with the nonhypermobility group.
Shown in research to perform a primary role in the processing and memory of emotional reactions, the amygdalae are considered part of the limbic system.
The scientists found that neurons in the right amygdala responded preferentially to pictures of animals, whether they were of cute little critters or threatening big beasts.he amygdalae are two almond-shaped groups of neurons located deep within the brain.
The study offers insight into economic behavior, and also into the role of the brain's amygdalae, two almond-shaped clusters of tissue located in the medial temporal lobes.
The subjects could not see, feel, or hear the experimenter while in the scanner, but still their amygdalae lit up when they believed the experimenter to be close by.