amygdala


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amygdala

 [ah-mig´dah-lah]
1. an almond-shaped structure.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

a·myg·da·la

, gen. and pl.

a·myg·da·lae

(ă-mig'dă-lă, -lē),
1. The lymphatic tonsils (pharyngeal, palatine, lingual, laryngeal, and tubal).
2. General term used for the amygdaloid body [TA], which is thought to assess and assign emotional valence to somatic, visceral, and olfactory sensory input.
[L. fr. G. amygdalē, almond; in Mediev. & Mod. L., a tonsil]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

amygdala

(ə-mĭg′də-lə)
n. pl. amygda·lae (-lē)
Either of two small, almond-shaped masses of gray matter that are part of the limbic system and are located in the temporal lobes of the cerebral hemispheres. Also called amygdaloid nucleus.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

a·myg·da·la

, gen. and pl. amygdalae (ă-mig'dă-lă, -lē)
Denoting the cerebellar tonsil, as well as the lymphatic tonsils (pharyngeal, palatine, lingual, laryngeal, and tubal).
[L. fr. G. amygdalē, almond; in Mediev. & Mod. L., a tonsil]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

amygdala

An almond-shaped brain nucleus at the front of the temporal lobe. The amygdala is concerned with memory registration.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
At the beginning of the study, before any training, students who reported higher stress levels showed more amygdala activity when they saw fearful faces.
Research has long established that the amygdala is largely responsible for recognizing and feeling fear.
However, the researchers found that nerve cells that produced NPY in the amygdala had receptors for insulin, a hormone which control food intake.
It's part of the fight or flight response, which is activated when we're under stress, or when the amygdala perceives a serious threat.
In a 2014 study, Garfinkel and colleagues examined amygdala activity in individuals with PTSD.
"This segregation between sweet and bitter regions in both the taste cortex and amygdala meant we could independently manipulate these brain regions and monitor any resulting changes in behaviour."
The SSRI-exposed infants also had a significant (P less than .05) increase in connectivity between the right amygdala and the right insula versus controls (Cohen's d, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.40-1.57).
Avino, Ph.D., from the University of California, Davis, in Sacramento, and colleagues reported the results of a stereological analysis of the number of neurons in amygdala nuclei of 52 human brains aged 2 to 48 years.
The amygdala is a key limbic structure of the brain nestled in the medial aspect of the temporal lobes and is involved in mood regulation and anxiety.
Controlling the amygdala is the vital thing to mastering precisely how to cease panic and anxiety attacks naturally.
Now it appears that stress raises metabolic activity in the amygdala, the area of the brain responsible for emotions, including fear.