amplification

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amplification

 [am″plĭ-fĭ-ka´shun]
the process of making larger, such as the increase of an auditory or visual stimulus, as a means of improving its perception.
DNA amplification artificial increase in the number of copies of a particular DNA fragment into millions of copies through replication of the segment into which it has been cloned, a type of nucleic acid amplification.
gene amplification a process by which the number of copies of a gene is increased in certain cells because extra copies of DNA are made in response to certain signals of cell development or of stress from the environment. In humans this process is seen most often in malignant cells.
nucleic acid amplification amplification of a specific nucleic acid sequence, such as to test for presence of a given virus or bacteria in a sample. Types include DNA amplification, ligase chain reaction, and polymerase chain reaction.

am·pli·fi·ca·tion

(am'pli-fi-kā'shŭn),
The process of making larger, as in increasing an acoustic or visual stimulus to enhance its perception.
[L. amplificatio, an enlarging]

amplification

/am·pli·fi·ca·tion/ (33000) (am″plĭ-fĭ-ka´shun) the process of making larger, such as the increase of an auditory stimulus, as a means of improving its perception.
gene amplification  the process by which the number of copies of a gene is increased in certain cells; in humans it is most often seen in malignant cells.

amplification

(ăm′plə-fĭ-kā′shən)
n.
1. The act or result of amplifying, enlarging, or extending.
2. Physics
a. The process of increasing the magnitude of a variable quantity, especially the magnitude of voltage, power, or current, without altering any other quality.
b. The result of such a process.
3. Genetics The process by which extra copies of a gene or a DNA sequence are formed.

amplification

[am′plifikā′shən]
Etymology: L, amplificare, to make wider
1 (genetic) a process whereby certain targeted sequences of DNA are replicated by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in order to produce multiple copies of a single or limited number of genes. Often this refers to increasing the proportion of plasmid DNA relative to the amount of bacterial DNA.
2 the replication in bulk of an entire DNA library. See also polymerase chain reaction. amplify, v.

amplification

An in vivo (as in the fragile X syndrome) or in vitro (as in cloning or PCR) increase in the number of copies of a specific gene or DNA sequence of interest.

amplification

Molecular biology An in vivo–as in the fragile X syndrome or in vitro–as in cloning or PCR ↑ in the number of copies of a specific gene or DNA sequence of interest. See Cloning, DNA amplification, Exon amplification, Extreme amplification, Gene amplification, Linked linear amplification, PCR, PCR amplification of specific alleles, Solid phase amplification.

am·pli·fi·ca·tion

(am'pli-fi-kā'shŭn)
1. The process of making larger, as in increasing an auditory or visual stimulus to enhance its perception.
2. molecular biology Process of increasing the number of nucleic acid copies in a sample to millions within a short period.
[L. amplificatio, an enlarging]

amplification

The production of extra copies of a DNA sequence. These may be within the chromosomal sequence or outside it.

Amplification

A process by which something is made larger. In clotting, only a very few chemicals are released by the initial injury; they result in a cascade of chemical reactions which produces increasingly larger quantities of different chemicals, resulting in an appropriately-sized, strong fibrin clot.
Mentioned in: Hemophilia

amplification

1. the process of making larger, as the increase of an auditory or visual stimulus, as a means of improving its perception.
2. said of a virus means multiplication; replication.
3. in polymerase chain reaction, the synthesis of multiple copies of a particular nucleic acid template sequence.
References in periodicals archive ?
Association between Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 Amplification and Clinical Characteristics
8 months in patients with FGFR1 amplification and 42.
Our review reports that the prevalence of FGFR1 amplification was 8.
4 meter thickness, which could also influence the amplification of vibration.
4) shows that there occurs one main peak of amplification situated at frequency 3.
The amount and quality of total RNA and amplification products were determined by use of a NanoDrop[R] ND-1000 Spectrophotometer (NanoDrop Technologies) after purification of the amplification products.
The fragmented and biotin-labeled cRNA or cDNA targets were hybridized to either HG-U133A or U133A v2 GeneChip arrays, stained with streptavidin-phycoerythrin with antibody amplification, and scanned according to the manufacturer's protocols, except that only 2-2.
A Kaplan-Meier (15) estimate, with standard errors of Peto et al (16) of the survival distributions for patients with and without MYCC amplification (Figure 3), reveals sufficient evidence to conclude that survival among MYCC-amplified patients is poorer than among nonamplified patients (P < .
While the cases with positive findings were few, they clearly indicated that oncogenic amplification can occur in the absence of the so-called anaplastic or large cell phenotype.
A total of 7,600 reference-blood samples from multiple populations was analyzed using the AmpFLSTR[R] Profiler Plus[TM] amplification kit.
The Samples 1, 3, and 4 showed amplification of one allele at the Y chromosome at the Amelogenin locus, which is anomalous.
The Sunrise Amplification Detection System will be available directly from Oncor.