self-esteem

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self-esteem

 [self es-tēm´]
respect for or pride about oneself; see also self-esteem enhancement.
chronic low s.-e. a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a longstanding negative self-evaluation or feeling about one's own self or self-capabilities.
risk for situational low s.-e. a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as being at risk for developing a negative perception of self-worth (situational low self-esteem).
situational low s.-e. a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a negative perception of self-worth in response to a current situation (specify).

self-esteem

(sĕlf′ĭ-stēm′)
n.
Pride in oneself; self-respect.

self-esteem1

the degree of worth and competence one attributes to oneself. See also self-concept.

self-esteem2

a nursing outcome from the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) defined as personal judgment of self-worth. See also Nursing Outcomes Classification.

self-esteem

Self-worth Psychology The internalized sense of one's own worth

self-esteem

the totality of a person's evaluation of their worth as an individual. Also known as self-evaluation and self-worth.

self-esteem,

n the degree of worth and competence one attributes to oneself.
References in periodicals archive ?
To protect the unfortunate young fellow from this moral death to which he was so near, the priest began by awakening amour-propre and self-esteem in him.
The vicar used amour-propre to combat self-contempt in the young Rousseau and awaken in him a pride which demanded that he have integrity if he wished to maintain a good opinion of himself.
And it is only amour-propre that gives rise to that kind of concern.
Only while it was amour-propre did Rousseau's self-love lead him to raise his hand against injustice.
Socrates, by contrast, though not as free of amour-propre as Jean-Jacques would later be, was still free of its grip to a remarkable degree.
Understanding that the psychological seat of virtue and moral passion is amour-propre - more specifically, pride - Rousseau advises those who hope to achieve good republican government to encourage pride.
None of this is to say that the benefits of amour-propre have outweighed the devastation it has wrought.
Just as Rousseau divides self-love into amour de soi and amour-propre, so he divides amour-propre itself - into pride and vanity.
28) Amour-propre is always concerned with satisfying the need for self-worth; it is born only when the need for "good witness of oneself," a need which was unproblematic in the pure state of nature and which still is unproblematic in the infant, ceases to be unproblematic and becomes contingent.
Doubtless there are times when it is difficult, perhaps even impossible, to determine whether an instance of amour-propre should be considered pride or vanity.
If it is the life of solitary reverie that one seeks, then pride, while not as destructive as vanity, should nevertheless be minimized, for the life of solitary reverie depends for its success on transcending amour-propre of any variety.
But the whole meaning of his naturalness is that in him amour-propre is allied with amour de sol and serves as its junior partner.