self-esteem

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self-esteem

 [self es-tēm´]
respect for or pride about oneself; see also self-esteem enhancement.
chronic low s.-e. a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a longstanding negative self-evaluation or feeling about one's own self or self-capabilities.
risk for situational low s.-e. a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as being at risk for developing a negative perception of self-worth (situational low self-esteem).
situational low s.-e. a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a negative perception of self-worth in response to a current situation (specify).
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

self-esteem

(sĕlf′ĭ-stēm′)
n.
Pride in oneself; self-respect.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

self-esteem

Self-worth Psychology The internalized sense of one's own worth
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Besides providing a psychological basis for the exercise of virtue, amour-propre also helps to cultivate pity.
Amour-propre also has moral uses in people who lack Emile's integrity and naturalness.
To protect the unfortunate young fellow from this moral death to which he was so near, the priest began by awakening amour-propre and self-esteem in him.
The vicar used amour-propre to combat self-contempt in the young Rousseau and awaken in him a pride which demanded that he have integrity if he wished to maintain a good opinion of himself.
Nor are amour-propre's moral contributions limited to nay-saying virtue, or to fighting moral disease.
Only while it was amour-propre did Rousseau's self-love lead him to raise his hand against injustice.
Cato, Rousseau's exemplary citizen, was the embodiment of the finest kind of amour-propre. Socrates, by contrast, though not as free of amour-propre as Jean-Jacques would later be, was still free of its grip to a remarkable degree.(19) Both men found themselves living under tyranny, but they responded entirely differently.
Understanding that the psychological seat of virtue and moral passion is amour-propre - more specifically, pride - Rousseau advises those who hope to achieve good republican government to encourage pride.
None of this is to say that the benefits of amour-propre have outweighed the devastation it has wrought.
Just as Rousseau divides self-love into amour de soi and amour-propre, so he divides amour-propre itself - into pride and vanity.
Beginning with the First Discourse, all of Rousseau's writings reflect a subtle consciousness of amour-propre's moral ambiguity.
Some have argued that Rousseau offers no clear and workable distinction between the two forms of amour-propre.(27) Certainly he never does so in a thorough and systematic way.