amorphous

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amorphous

 [ah-mor´fus]
having no definite form; shapeless.

a·mor·phous

(ă-mōr'fŭs),
1. Without definite shape or visible differentiation in structure.
2. Not crystallized.

amorphous

adjective Lacking a fixed shape; shapeless

a·mor·phous

(ā-mōr'fŭs)
1. Without definite form or visible differentiation in structure.
2. Not crystallized.

amorphous

1. Of no particular shape or form.
2. Lacking distinct crystalline structure.

a·mor·phous

(ā-mōr'fŭs)
1. Without definite shape or visible differentiation in structure.
2. Not crystallized.
References in periodicals archive ?
toward the Constitution are simply a confused jumble, amorphously
Since the past is important, and because historical constructions inform us about the past, albeit amorphously, history's importance remains absent the esteem as the sole decisive factor in legal decisions.
As was the case with the amorphously political ethos of Love Parade, the commercial success of all-male West Coast US punk bands in the 1990s was directly proportional to the lack of meaningful political discourse espoused by the artists, both in their music and otherwise.
And far from producing precise votes on precise subjects, the questions referendums contain are so often amorphously phrased they make party manifestos appear models of clarity.
Financial institutions cannot amorphously coordinate themselves toward any overarching environmental policy goals, such as reducing a given pollutant by a desired amount or conserving a given level of an environmental resource.
For consumers raised on tastes like fruit punch, there is a quality in Sprite Remix that is amorphously familiar: "I think I know it, but not really."
The claim ignores the ability of discriminatory practice to amorphously endure policy changes.
(21) Amorphously localized in reading, this otherness can be figured as the supplemental or shadow self: the hero of identification in Rilke and Baumeister alike, even marginally in Vuillard.
In being cellular and amorphously drawn across societies, groups such as Al-Qaeda can only work in deterrence theory if they know they can be found and duly attacked.
This curiously disjointed collection of meanings leaves us with a small mystery: Why is it that the Targums, Vulgate, and Pesitta show an interpretation, "let grow long," nearly the reverse of those found in the Septuagint and Codex Ambrosianus ("strip" and "cut, trim"), with Symmachus and the Ambrosian marginal reading occupying an amorphously literalistic middle ground ("send")?
It creates a dream-like atmosphere representative of the unconscious, where images arise and dissolve amorphously.
We are left with determining genocide amorphously: You know it when you see it.