amorpha


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amorpha

An obsolete term for a disease which does not cause any structural changes.
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Establishment of Acanthoscelide pallidipennis (Coleoptera: Bruchidae) feeding in seeds of the introduced legume Amorpha fruticose, with new record of its Eupelmus parasitoid in Japan.
pseudacorus) in short-term abandonment neo-ecosystems, false indigo (Amorpha fructicosa) in long-term abandonment neo-ecosystems, Japanese honeysuckle (L.
Solidago nemoralis, Aster azureus, Amorpha canescens, and Coreopsis
Jayne Yack at Carleton University in Ottawa revealed that walnut sphinx caterpillars (Amorpha juglandis) could toot from their sides.
Ehlke, have provided guidance in his study of genetic diversity in Amorpha fruticosa and Desmanthus illinoensis, two native leguminous species that are potential multiple-use crops.
Dominant herbaceous plants include grasses (e.g., Andropogon gerardi, Sorghastrum nutans, Schizachyrium scoparium, Poa pratensis, Stipa spartea, and Panicum praecocius), forbs (e.g., Asclepias tuberosa, Asclepias syriaca, Ambrosia coronopirolia, Lithospermum carolinense, Comandra richardsoniana, and Artemisia ludoviciana), and legumes (Lathyrus venosus, Amorpha canescens, and Lespedeza capitata).
Additional prairie taxa include Amorpha canescens, Ratibida pinnata, Ceanothus americanus, Silphium laciniatum, and Monarda cf.
Legume populations are often limited by herbivory and when plants are protected from herbivores by exclosures, some fast growing, early maturing legume species are able to dramatically increase in abundance, while the relative abundances of less preferred legume species (e.g., Lespedeza capilata and Amorpha canescens) do not change (Ritchie and Tilman, 1995; Ritchie et al., 1998; Knops et al., 2000).
Mid-grass prairie; the common species include the grasses Bouteloua curtipendula, Schizachyrium scoparium, and Hesperostipa spartea and forbs such as Amorpha canescens, Symphyotrichum oblongifolium, Dalea purpureum, Erysimium capimtum, and Brickellia eupatorioides.
Compatibility has been shown for tall fescue with either birdsfoot trefoil or white clover (Pederson and Brink, 1988; Beuselinck et al., 1992; Springer et al., 1996) and for switchgrass, indiangrass, or sideoats grama (Bouteloua curtipendula Michx.) mixed with either purple prairieclover [Petalostemon purpureum (Vent.) Rydb.], roundhead lespedeza, leadplant (Amorpha canescens Pursh), Illinois bundleflower, catclaw sensitive brier [Schrankia nuttallii (DC.) Standl.], or cicer milkvetch (Astragalus cicer L., Posler et al., 1993).