Amoeba

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Amoeba

 [ah-me´bah]
a genus of ameboid protozoa, most of which are free-living. Those parasitic in humans and once included in this genus have been assigned to other genera.

Amoeba

(ă-mē'bă),
A genus of naked, lobose, pseudopod-forming protozoa of the class Sarcodina (or Rhizopoda), which are abundant soil-dwellers, especially in rich organic debris, and are also commonly found as parasites. The typical amebic parasites of humans are now placed in the genera Entamoeba, Endolimax, and Iodamoeba.
See also: Naegleria.
[Mod. L. fr. G. amoibē change]

Amoeba

/Amoe·ba/ (ah-me´bah) a genus of amebae.

amoeba

also

ameba

(ə-mē′bə)
n. pl. amoe·bas or amoe·bae (-bē)
Any of various one-celled free-living or parasitic protozoans having no definite form and moving by means of pseudopods.

a·moe′bic (-bĭk) adj.

amoeba

See ameba.

Amoeba

(1) A genus of amoebas of the order Amoebida.
(2) An imprecise name for several types of free-living unicellular phagocytic organisms; the pathogenic amoebas have been reclassified as Entamoeba spp, Endolimax spp, and others
Giant forms (eg. Amoeba proteus may be up to 2 mm long and crawl over surfaces by protruding pseudopods). Amoebae exhibit great plasticity of form and conspicuous cytoplasmic streaming.

Amoeba

Parasitology A genus of amebas of the order Amoebida

amoeba

Ameba An imprecise name for several types of free living unicellular phagocytic organisms; the pathogenic amebas have been reclassified as Entamoeba spp, Endolimax spp, and others

A·moe·ba

(ă-mē'bă)
A genus of naked, lobose, pseudopod-forming protozoa of the class Sarcodina (or Rhizopoda), which are abundant soil-dwellers, especially in rich organic debris, and are also commonly found as parasites. The typical amebic parasites in humans are placed in the genera Entamoeba,Endolimax, and Iodamoeba.
[Mod. L. fr. G. amoibē change]

amoeba

A single-celled microscopic organism of indefinite shape commonly found in water, damp soil and as parasites of other animals. Some amoebae, such as Entamoeba histolytica and Acanthamoeba castellani cause disease in man, respectively AMOEBIC DYSENTERY and acanthamoebic keratitis.
Amoebaclick for a larger image
Fig. 31 Amoeba . General structure.

Amoeba

a genus of unicellular PROTOZOANS in the class Rhizopoda. Amoebae are characterized by their changing shape brought about by the projection of PSEUDOPODIA which have a locomotory function. Amoeba is often wrongly quoted as an example of a primitive organism, low on the evolutionary scale. However, as in many PROTISTA, functions that are carried out by organ systems in so-called ‘higher’ forms are here carried out within a single cell, therefore they cannot be considered ‘primitive’; they are highly evolved over millions of years, albeit on a different scale from higher organisms.

Amoeba

A type of protozoa (one-celled animal) that can move or change its shape by extending projections of its cytoplasm.
Mentioned in: Stool O & P Test

A·moe·ba

(ă-mē'bă)
A genus of naked, lobose, pseudopod-forming protozoa of the class Sarcodina (or Rhizopoda), which are abundant soil-dwellers, especially in rich organic debris, and are also commonly found as parasites. The typical amebic parasites in humans are placed in the genera Entamoeba, Endolimax, and Iodamoeba.
[Mod. L. fr. G. amoibē change]

amoeba (əmē´bə),

n a Rhizopod protozoa that uses extensions of its cytoplasm, called pseudopodia, to move. Some varieties of amoebae are implicated in human infection. Also spelled
ameba(s).

Amoeba

a genus of the subphylum Sarcodina. It is a single-celled mass of protoplasm which changes shape by extending cytoplasmic processes called pseudopodia by which it moves about and absorbs nutrients. The majority of amebae are free-living in soil and water. See also amebic.

Patient discussion about Amoeba

Q. is an Amoeba dangerous?? and how can i get rid of it? my son is in Peru, he called and told me he got an Amoeba..i have no idea if it's dangerous or not, and how to get rid of it. and what kinds of food he needs to avoid.I'll appreciate help!

A. oooo...an Amoeba is a nasty one...but not so dangerous! it's a one celled parasite which gets into your body if you eat in restaurants that the cook doesn't wash hands after going to the bathroom..it multiplies in your intestine and makes you diarrhea like hell. but if you'll treat it right it will go away as nothing happened. if you don't it can give you liver cyst. and that's not good. he should see a Dr.

More discussions about Amoeba
References in periodicals archive ?
Testate amoebae were photographed with a digital camera (Samsung Galaxy Camera) attached to the eyepiece of the optical microscope (Nikon Eclipse E 100), at lateral and ventral views.
Regarding the community associated with aquatic macrophytes, the occurrence and abundance of testate amoebae in this habitat are closely linked to a set of factors provided by these plants, such as the microenvironments within the water column (Declerck et al.
The social amoebae can be found almost everywhere; in Antarctica, in deserts, in the canopies of tropical forests, and in Forest Park, the urban park that adjoins Washington University.
1994) had revealed that more number of amoebae was enumerated on NNA seeded with heat killed E.
After these "farmer" amoebae aggregate into a slug, they migrate in search of nourishment-and form a fruiting body, or a stalk of dead amoebae topped by a sorus, a structure containing fertile spores.
The flask containing the amoebae was scraped to mechanically remove the amoebae from the surface.
In related work, the team found that the CLP-gene-expression levels in strains SBW25 or SS101 increased by fourfold when the amoebae approached to within 1 centimeter of the bacteria.
For some experiments infected amoebae were removed by vigorous shaking after chilling the cultures at 4[degrees]C.
The identity of the amoebae infecting western LIS lobster is unknown because criteria previously used to identify these amoebae have now been shown to be inadequate.
Moreover, ARB may use free-living amoebae as a training ground for the selection of virulence traits, as demonstrated for Cryptococcus neoformans (11).
octocarinatus even in the presence of high predator numbers, and diminished reproduction of the amoebae.