amnestic


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amnestic

 [am-nes´tik]
characterized by or pertaining to amnesia.
amnestic disorders mental disorders characterized by acquired impairment in the ability to learn and recall new information, sometimes accompanied by inability to recall previously learned information, and not coupled to dementia or delirium. The disorders are subclassified on the basis of etiology as amnestic disorder due to a general medical condition, substance-induced persisting amnestic disorder, and amnestic disorder not otherwise specified.
amnestic syndrome a mental disorder characterized by impairment in short- and long-term memory, with anterograde and sometimes retrograde amnesia, occurring in a normal state of consciousness. Disorientation, confabulation, and a lack of insight into the memory deficit may be present. The most common cause is thiamine deficiency associated with chronic alcohol abuse (alcohol amnestic disorder, korsakoff's syndrome), but the syndrome may result from any pathologic process causing bilateral damage to certain structures in the medial temporal lobe and diencephalon, including head trauma, brain tumors, infarction, cerebral hypoxia, carbon monoxide poisoning, and herpes simplex encephalitis.

am·nes·tic

(am-nes'tik),
1. Synonym(s): amnesic
2. An agent causing amnesia.

amnestic

/am·nes·tic/ (am-nes´tik)
2. causing amnesia.

am·nes·tic

(am-nes'tik)
1. Synonym(s): amnesic.
2. An agent causing amnesia.
3. A disorder in which the essential feature is an impairment of the memory function.

am·nes·tic

(am-nes'tik)
1. Synonym(s): amnesic.
2. An agent causing amnesia.

amnestic (amnes´tik),

adj amnesic; causing amnesia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Posterior cortical atrophy can be very different than the traditional amnestic variant of Alzheimer's disease.
Para-suicidal amnestic behavior associated with chronic Zolpidem use: implications for patient safety.
Ketamine is an effective and safe agent with analgesic, hypnotic and amnestic affects, does not alter pharyngeal and laryngeal reflexes and minimizes aspiration possibility during procedure.
Participants presenting an objective impairment in at least one memory domain (immediate and/or delayed verbal memory subtests) with or without impairment in any other cognitive domain received a diagnosis of amnestic MCI (aMCI) (Petersen 2004).
The first comprised 20 healthy controls and 24 amnestic MCI patients (11 with single-domain MCI and 13 with multidomain MCI).
However, Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the predominance of this amnestic state.
MCI is typically classified into four broad subgroups depending on the cognitive areas affected: (a) amnestic MCI (aMCI) single domain, in which only memory is affected; (b) amnestic MCI multiple domain, in which memory is affected among other cognitive abilities; (c) non-amnestic MCI (naMCI) single domain, in which there is decline in only one cognitive domain excluding memory; and (d) non-amnestic MCI multiple domain, in which there is a decline in multiple cognitive functions excluding memory.
Even patients classified as amnestic MCI (aMCI) were found to have deficits in at least one of five subdomains of executive function (i.
Objective: The present study aimed to investigate the relationship among neurocognitive variables, depressive symptoms, functional activities, and the quality of life (QoL) in patients with mild dementia and single-domain amnestic mild cognitive impairment (a-MCI).
Among the participants, 71 were diagnosed with amnestic mild cognitive impairment, a condition characterized by memory loss.
Executive skills compensate for the memory impairment in amnestic MCI.