aminotransferase


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transaminase

 [trans-am´ĭ-nās]
any of a group of enzymes that catalyze the reversible transfer of an amino group from a donor, usually an amino acid, to an acceptor, usually a 2-keto acid. Most use pyridoxal phosphate as a coenzyme.

a·mi·no·trans·fer·ase

(ă-mē'nō-trans'fĕr-ase),
Enzyme that transfers amino groups from an amino acid to a keto acid, for example, l-alanine and 2-ketoglutarate. Often, the amino acid is an α-amino acid and the keto acid is an α-keto acid.
Synonym(s): transaminases

aminotransferase

/ami·no·trans·fer·ase/ (-trans´fer-ās) transaminase.

aminotransferase

(ə-mē′nō-trăns′fə-rās′, -rāz′, ăm′ə-)

aminotransferase

[-trans′fərās]
enzymes that catalyze the transfer of an amino group from an amino acid to an alpha-keto acid, with pyridoxal phosphate and pyridoxamine phosphate acting as coenzymes. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST), normally present in serum and various tissues, especially in the heart and liver, is released by damaged cells, and as a result, a high serum level may be diagnostic of myocardial infarction or hepatic disease. Alanine aminotransferase, a normal constituent of serum, especially in the liver, is released by injured tissue and may be present in high concentrations in the sera of patients with acute liver disease. Previously called transaminase.

a·mi·no·trans·fer·ase

(ă-mē'nō-trans'fĕr-ās)
[EC sub-group 2.6.1] Enzyme transferring amino groups between an amino acid to (usually) a 2-keto acid.
Synonym(s): aminopherase, transaminase.

aminotransferase

see TRANSAMINASE.

aminotransferase

an enzyme that catalyzes the reversible transfer of an amino group from an α-amino acid to an α-keto acid using the coenzyme pyridoxal phosphate. Called also transaminase.

alanine aminotransferase
an enzyme that has high serum levels after acute damage to liver cells. Called also ALT. See also alanine aminotransferase.
aspartate aminotransferase
an enzyme that has high serum levels after skeletal muscle damage or acute damage to liver cells. Called also AST. See also aspartate aminotransferase.
References in periodicals archive ?
First, the relationship between alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has not yet been clearly established, although increased liver enzymes are usually used as a surrogate marker of NAFLD.
An immunological procedure for determination of mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase in human serum.
Also, short term CPAP therapy doesn't seem have beneficial effects on serum aminotransferase levels in patients of OSAS.
Souza studied the incidence of hepatitis and aminotransferase changes in patients of dengue in Brazil.
In one of our earlier paper we have already concluded that raised serum bilirubin, unconjugated bilirubin, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and prothrombin time were predictors of mortality in patients with mushroom poisoning.
Multiple linear regression analysis was used with serum bilirubin as an objective variable and age, sex, disease duration, medication history, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, TP, CRP, and ESR as explanatory variables, indicating that serum bilirubin was correlated with ESR (b = -0.
2 A previous study3 done in Pakistan, demonstrated that 15% of dengue patients developed severe hepatitis (alanine aminotransferase [ALT] >300 units per litre [U/L]), and was associated with longer hospital stay, increased mortality and other complications.
Conclusion: Mean serum alanine aminotransferase value in young healthy adults included in this study was 29.
The VetScan with Avian/Reptilian Profile Plus rotors reports concentrations of the following analytes: albumin, aspartate aminotransferase, bile acids, calcium, creatine kinase, globulin, glucose, phosphorus, potassium, total protein, sodium, and uric acid.
Mean alanine aminotransferase levels were also markedly elevated in ALD (78.
At admission to hospital, these 25 patients had significantly higher occurrence of cardiac, respiratory, and renal manifestations and had significantly higher leukocyte counts and levels of serum lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase, and creatinine, which are clinical and laboratory indicators of sepsis, than did patients without severe sepsis or septic shock (Table 2).
Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) [2] was 16 U/L initially but decreased until it became undetectable (<6 U/L) on the Architect 16200 (Table 1).