amine test

amine test

A for BACTERIAL VAGINOSIS-vaginal infection with Gardnerella vaginalis -sometimes called the ‘fish’ test. A drop of vaginal discharge is mixed with a drop of saline on a slide and a drop of 5% potassium hydroxide added. If positive, a fishy amine smell is at once apparent.
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Whiff test (Amine test) was done for bacterial vaginosis.
Other criteria are: whitish-yellow discharge, pH> 4.5, positive Amine test.
Whiff test (Amine test) helps in making diagnosis through ammonical odour (fishy odour).
The 10 who returned for a checkup 1 month later were in remission, with no symptoms, no clue cells, a negative amine test result, and no more than one of four Amsel criteria.
The amine test was performed by adding few drops of 10% KOH (potassium hydroxide) solution directly over vaginal secretions smeared on glass slide to find out if there was emission of amine like odour.
Finally, the sensitivity and specificity of clinicians' diagnoses of bacterial vaginosis (76% and 71%, respectively) are comparable to those reported by others.[9] The clinical diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis by Amsel's criteria[17] (presence of 3 of 4 indicators: adherent vaginal discharge, clue cells, pH>4.5, and a positive amine test) is the reference standard to which other tests for bacterial vaginosis are usually compared.[18,19] In many office laboratories, the complex criteria are no doubt frequently reduced to include only clue cell recognition, despite its low sensitivity.
Cure of bacterial vaginosis was defined as the presence of fewer than three of Amsel's criteria (vaginal pH less than 4.5; clue cells 20% or more; positive amine test; thin, nonclumping, gray-white adherent discharge).
If a pH test is performed in addition to the amine test, 83986 can also be billed.
Their efficacy has been established by symptom resolution, safety profile, and by laboratory testing with vaginal wet prep, pH determination, amine test, Gram's stain, and vaginal culture.
Bacterial vaginosis was defined as the presence of clue cells in a vaginal specimen and at least two of the following findings: a vaginal discharge, vaginal specimen pH greater than 4.5, or a positive amine test following the addition of 10% potassium hydroxide (KOH) to the specimen.[12] Bacterial vaginosis was also defined as a positive DNA probe test result for G vaginalis (Affirm VPIII, Microprobe, Bothell, Wash) and a pH greater than 4.5.[19] The exclusion criterion was a history of hypersensitivity to metronidazole, parabens, propylene glycol, clindamycin, or mineral oil.