amine


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Related to amine: amide

amine

 [am´in, ah´mēn]
an organic compound containing nitrogen.
biogenic amine bioamine.
sympathomimetic a's amines that mimic the actions of the sympathetic nervous system, the group includes the catecholamines and drugs that mimic their actions.
vasoactive a's amines that cause vasodilation and increase small vessel permeability, such as histamine and serotonin.

a·mine

, primary aminesecondary aminetertiary aminequaternary ammonium ion (ă-mēn', am'in), Although this word is correctly stressed on the first syllable, U.S. usage often stresses it on the last syllable.
A substance formally derived from ammonia by the replacement of one or more of the hydrogen atoms by hydrocarbon or other radicals. The substitution of one hydrogen atom constitutes a primary amine; that of two atoms, a secondary amine; that of three atoms, a tertiary amine; and that of four atoms, a quaternary ammonium ion, a positively charged ion isolated only in association with a negative ion. The amines form salts with acids.

amine

(ah-mēn´) (am´in) an organic compound containing nitrogen; any of a group of compounds formed from ammonia by replacement of one or more hydrogen atoms by organic radicals.
biogenic amine  a type of amine synthesized by plants and animals and frequently involved in signaling, e.g., neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine, catecholamines, and serotonin; others are hormones or components of vitamins, phospholipids, bacteria, or ribosomes, e.g., cadaverine, choline, histamine, and spermine.
sympathomimetic amines  amines that mimic the actions of the sympathetic nervous system, comprising the catecholamines and drugs that mimic their actions.

amine

[am′in, əmēn′]
Etymology: L, ammonia
(in chemistry) an organic derivative of ammonia in which one or more hydrogen atoms are replaced by alkyl or aryl groups.

a·mine

(ă-mēn')
A substance derived from ammonia by the replacement of one or more of the hydrogen atoms by hydrocarbon or other radicals. The substitution of one hydrogen atom constitutes a primary amine, e.g., NH2CH3; that of two atoms, a secondary amine, e.g., NH(CH3)2; that of three atoms, a tertiary amine, e.g., N(CH3)3; and that of four atoms, a quaternary ammonium ion, e.g., +N(CH3)4, a positively charged ion isolated only in association with a negative ion. The amines form salts with acids.

amine

A class of organic compounds derived from ammonia by replacing one or more of the hydrogen atoms by a member of the paraffin series or by an aromatic group. Amines occur widely in the body, and many drugs are amines.

amine

an organic base formed by replacing one or more of the hydrogen atoms of ammonia by organic groups.

a·mine

(ă-mēn') Although this word is correctly stressed on the first syllable, U.S. usage often stresses it on the last syllable as shown here.
A substance formally derived from ammonia by the replacement of one or more of the hydrogen atoms by hydrocarbon or other radicals.

amine

an organic compound containing nitrogen.

biogenic a's
amine neurotransmitters, e.g. norepinephrine, serotonin and dopamine.
direct-acting sympathomimetic a's
activate adrenergic effector cells, e.g. catecholamine, directly and do not need adrenergic nerves to exert their effects.
amine hormones
enteroendocrine cells, distributed widely in the gastric, intestinal and pancreatic tissue, synthesize peptide and amine hormones that control the secretion of digestive juices. See also apud cells.
amine precursor uptake and decarboxylation cells
toxic a's
occur in plants, e.g. cyclopamine, tyramine.
vasoactive amine
amine that causes vasodilatation and increases small vessel permeability, e.g. histamine and serotonin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Amines are used as stabilizers, chemical intermediates, and neutralizers in personal care application.
BASF's portfolio encompasses about 200 different kinds of amines, including alkyl--, alkanol--, and alkoxyalkylamines, as well as heterocyclic, aromatic, chiral, and specialty amines.
Amine is a surfer, and grew up in the Californian surf culture.
The yellow color of the dry material may arise from the polyester itself and from the particular amine added.
The Amine Shield slipstream technology, developed by MPR Services, Dickinson, Texas, employs a multifunctional unit that removes solids, hydrocarbons, and heat-stable salts from an amine system.
Liquid leaks in the amine piping system are severe fire, explosion and exposure hazards and should be shut down and repaired immediately.
Our programme will offer tailor-made analyses, a technical report within three weeks of the solvent's arrival and advice on how to improve the operation and reliability of the amine unit based on the test results and Shell's operational experience.
Copper-containing amine oxidases can be found in all kinds of organisms such as bacteria, yeasts, mushrooms, various plants, and animals [2-10].
Ethanolamines, the largest amine type by production volume, will continue to show the fastest growth through 2010 despite moderating from the 2000-2005 pace.
Dabco 33-LV and BL-11 tertiary amine catalysts for flexible slabstock and flexible molded systems provide precise control of gelling and blowing.
Reactions of amine with oxirane will occur at different rates depending on reactivity of the active amine hydrogen (2) and stoichiometric concentration of the amine relative to oxirane.
The depletion of copper and amine from copper amine- and amine-treated Scots pine blocks was investigated.