amidine


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am·i·dine

(am'i-dēn),
The monovalent radical -C(NH)-NH2.

amidine

/am·i·dine/ (am´ĭ-dēn) any compound containing the amidino (—C(dbondNH)—NH2) group.

am·i·dine

(am'i-dēn)
The monovalent radical -C(NH)-NH2.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, he says that the new amidines may be toxic to aquatic organisms.
Hourdiyenco, also known as Alex Amidine and Aleksandr Vetrov, faces charges of keeping a brothel in Westgate Road, controlling prostitution for gain and trafficking.
2] on one of the two outer backbone carbon atoms of dimethyl pimelimidate produces a tetrahedral intermediate that splits into the amidine link and methanol.
The formation of amidines between imido esters and amines from protein side chains was first described in 1962 by Hunter et al.
Radicals of this type can be prepared by reduction of the corresponding cations, which can be made by a variety of routes, the most versatile of which involves the condensation of a per-silylated amidine with S|Cl.
Subsequent addition of benzyl amine, which rapidly cyclized via a transient amidine salt (3), led to 2,3-disubstituted 3H-quinazolin-4-ones (4) (Scheme-6).
Cyclic amidine bases such as DBU also support rapid and efficient BUR cures.
Nitrogen-based nucleo-philes, including ammonia, amines, and amidines are highly reactive under solvent-free conditions, giving a range of thermoset (1), functional (2), and ionomer (3)derivatives.
Latent nucleophiles that are thermally activated may support vulcanization processes that do not suffer from scorch safety issues, while latent forms that are hydrolytically sensitive, such as bicyclic amidines (8), may support products intended for moisture-curing applications.
It has been known for some time that amidine and guanidine derivatives will inhibit C-mediated hemolysis (i.
Complement inhibition by amidines and guanidines-in vivo and in vitro results.