amide

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amide

 [am´īd]
any compound derived from ammonia by substitution of an acyl radical for hydrogen, or from an acid by replacing the -OH group by -NH2.

am·ide

, primary amidesecondary amidetertiary amide (am'īd, am'id),
A substance derived from ammonia by replacing hydrogen atoms with acyl groups, R-CO-NH2. Replacement of one hydrogen atom results in formation of a primary amide; of two hydrogen atoms, a secondary amide; and of three hdyrogen atoms, a tertiary amide. Amides can also be derived from a carboxylic acid by replacing a carboxylic OH with NH2 from a carboxylic acid by replacement of a carboxylic OH by NH2. Replacement of one hydrogen atom constitutes a primary amide; that of two hydrogen atoms, a secondary amide; and that of three atoms, a tertiary amide.

amide

(ăm′īd′, -ĭd)
n.
1. An organic compound, such as acetamide, containing the CONH2 group.
2. The anion of ammonia, NH2- or a compound containing this anion, such as sodium amide, NaNH2.

a·mid′ic (ə-mĭd′ĭk, ă-mĭd′-) adj.

am·ide

(am'īd)
A substance formally derived from ammonia through the substitution of one or more of the hydrogen atoms by acyl groups, R-CO-NH2, or from a carboxylic acid by replacement of a carboxylic OH by NH2. Replacement of one hydrogen atom constitutes a primary amide; that of two hydrogen atoms, a secondary amide; and that of three atoms, a tertiary amide.

amide

a compound formed from ammonia in which one or more hydrogen atoms are replaced by a metal or acid radical.

am·ide

(am'īd)
A substance formally derived from ammonia through the substitution of one or more of the hydrogen atoms by acyl groups, R-CO-NH2, or from a carboxylic acid by replacement of a carboxylic OH by NH2.
References in periodicals archive ?
FTIR: 1604 (C=C); 1620 (C=N); 1625 (C=O amidic); [sup.1]H NMR (600 MHz, CD[Cl.sub.3]): [[delta].sub.H] = 2.17, 2.43, 2.60 (9H, 3s, 3C[H.sub.3]), 3.39 (2H, s, C[H.sub.2] of pyrazole), 5.64 (2H, br.s, - OC[H.sub.2]CO), 6.26 (1H, s, [C.sub.3]-H), 7.14 (1H, d, [C.sub.6]-H, J = 78 Hz), 8.53 (1H, d, [C.sub.5]-H, J = 78 Hz); [sup.13]CNMR (150 MHz, CD[Cl.sub.3]): [[delta].sub.C] = 12.91, 21.33, 25.12, 29.70, 45.91, 112.29, 118.40, 119.86, 135.80, 150.07, 151.19, 161.86, 161.94, 168.48, 178.11, 207.09; MS (m/z): 312 [M.sup.+.].
FTIR: 1686 (C=O amidic); 1291 (C=S); 3132 (N-H); (Found: C, 43.61; H, 3.33; N, 15.22 [C.sub.13][H.sub.13]K[N.sub.4][O.sub.2][S.sub.2] requires C, 43.31; H, 3.63; N, 15.54.)
IR vmax/[cm.sup.-1]:1680 (amidic C=O), 1700 (carbonyl group of fluorescein), 3300 (amidic NH), 2900 (C-H), 3200-3500 (OH).
[sup.1]H NMR (400 MHz, [delta], ppm): 3.71 (PEG), 3.9-3.5 (C2(H)-C6(H) of cyclodextrin), 5.1 (C1(H) anomeric proton of cyclodextrin), 6.8-10 (C-H of Aromatic rings of Fluorescein), 11 (amidic NH), 7.25 (HC=C of thymine), 1.75 (C[H.sub.3] C=C).
The urea coated with poultry litter can be used in substitution to other amidic nitrogen sources, regardless of the soil moisture condition.
IR spectra of the isolated products revealed the predominance of the enol-form [7.sub.II]a-d due to the existence of strong absorption peaks in the region of v = 3360-3380 [cm.sup.-1] which corresponds to cyclic enol, while the amidic carbonyl absorption appeared at v = 1680 [cm.sup.-1].
FTIR: 3338, 3193 (-NHN[H.sub.2]), 1671 (C=O amidic), 1602 [cm.sup.-1] (C=N); [sup.1]H NMR (600 MHz, DMSO-[d.sub.6]) [[delta].sub.H]: 2.44, 2.61 (6H, 2s, 2C[H.sub.3]), 3.99 (2H, br.s, N[H.sub.2], [D.sub.2]O exchangeable), 5.20 (2H, s, -O[[CH.bar].sub.2]), 6.18 (1H, S, [C.sub.3]-H), 7.20 (1H, d, [C.sub.6]-H, J = 7.8 Hz), 8.46"(1H, d, [C.sub.5]-H, J = 7.8 Hz), 9.28 (1H, br.s, -CO[NH.bar] [D.sub.2]O exchangeable); [sup.13]C NMR (EtOD) [[delta].sub.C]: 24.01, 25.09, 46.63,112.16,118.17,121.02,136.19,151.09,155.19,163.50, 168.83,179.16; MS (m/z): 246 [M.sup.+*] (found: C, 58.53; H, 5.93; N, 22.55.
The reaction between terminal amine groups and acrylic acid gives rise to the formation of amidic bond (20), (40).
There is a good correlation between the in-line optical measurement and the off-line amidic content formed.
Therefore, the only change that takes place is the carboxylic and amidic moieties of the repeat units when they come into contact and taking place into what is known as dehydrocyclization.
Subscripts O and N represent two possible types of hydrogen bonds between phenolic proton and amidic group in two-position.