amide local anesthetic

amide local anesthetic

any of the numerous compounds containing an amide chemical group that block nerve transmission. Amides are metabolized by microsomal P-450 enzymes in the liver. Examples of commonly administered amide local anesthetics are bupivacaine, lidocaine, and prilocaine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ropivacaine is a long acting amide local anesthetic agent and first produced as a pure enantiomer.
Articaine hydrochloride: a study of the safety of a new amide local anesthetic.
Skin prick and intradermal test results are negative in the vast majority of patients but some authors recommend testing with the most commonly used amide local anesthetic (lidocaine).
The other available amide local anesthetic agents, articaine, bupivacaine and mepivacaine, are all considered Category C drugs.
Comparative motor-blocking effects of bupivacaine and ropivacaine, a new amino amide local anesthetic, in the rat and dog.
Preservatives added to either the amide local anesthetic or its epinephrine additive are structurally similar to PABA and elicit adverse reactions similar to those triggered by the ester drugs.
11) Amide local anesthetic agents are generally metabolized by microsomal enzymes in the liver; articaine, with its ester side chain, is hydrolyzed primarily by plasma esterases.
In fact, in centers where the in vitro muscle contraction test is performed to test for malignant hyperthermia, physicians use the amide local anesthetic prilocaine.
Lidocaine hydrochloride became the first marketed amide local anesthetic and now it is considered the "Gold Standard" to which other anesthetic solutions are compared.
Patients who were unwilling, posted for emergency surgeries, any significant medical history, otherwise contraindicated for spinal anesthesia, those allergic to amide local anesthetic or any other drug, ones with a history of drug or alcohol abuse were excluded from the study.