ameboma

ameboma

 [am″e-bo´mah]
a tumorlike mass caused by granulomatous reaction in the intestines in amebiasis.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

a·me·bo·ma

(ă'mē-bō'mă),
A nodular, tumorlike focus of proliferative inflammation sometimes developing in chronic amebiasis, especially in the wall of the colon.
Synonym(s): amebic granuloma
[ameba + G. -oma, tumor]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

a·me·bo·ma

(am'ē-bō'mă)
A nodular, tumorlike focus of proliferative inflammation sometimes developing in chronic amebiasis, especially in the wall of the colon.
Synonym(s): amebic granuloma.
[ameba + G. -oma, tumor]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Ameboma

A mass of tissue that can develop on the wall of the colon in response to amebic infection.
Mentioned in: Amebiasis
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
(2,3) Ameboma is a rare presentation of amebiasis occuring in 1.5% of cases and it usually occurs in the untreated or inadequately treated patients with amebiasis years after the last attack of dysentery.
So invasive amebiasis with colonic ameboma was diagnosed.
Ameboma is an inflammatory, exophytic and cicatricial mass lesion usually seen in patients with long standing and untreated or inadequately treated amebic infections.
Invasive amebiasis and ameboma formation presenting as a rectal mass: An uncommon case of malignant masquerade at a western medical center.
The formation of an ameboma is another uncommon manifestation that may occur in amebic colitis.
A granulomatous mass (ameboma) may form in the wall of the colon that can cause obstruction and is sometimes confused with cancer.
Occasionally a granulomatous mass called an ameboma forms in the intestinal wall and may cause bowel obstruction (Figure 6-15).
The bowel segment affected by amebiasis characteristically demonstrates necrotizing acute inflammation and undermining "flask-shaped" ulcers, but rarely, tumoral masses (so-called amebomas) may occur.