ameboid


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ameboid

 [ah-me´boid]
resembling an ameba.

a·me·boid

(ă-mē'boyd),
1. Resembling an ameba in appearance or characteristics.
2. Of irregular outline with peripheral projections; denoting the outline of a form of colony in plate culture.
[ameba + G. eidos, appearance]

ameboid

/ame·boid/ (ah-me´boid) resembling an ameba in form or movement.

ameboid

adjective Amoeba-like

a·me·boid

(ă-mē'boyd)
1. Resembling an ameba in appearance or characteristics.
2. Of irregular outline with peripheral projections; denoting the outline of a form of colony in plate culture.
Synonym(s): amoeboid.
[ameba + G. eidos, appearance]

ameboid

resembling an ameba.
References in periodicals archive ?
3) Polyblasts--the ameboid phagocytic mononuclear exudate cells.
The endothelium in inflammation forms new capillary sprouts; it may also proliferate and give off cells into the tissue which at once assume the characters of fibroblasts; but its elements never become transformed into ameboid cells.
He also could find no indication of a transformation of the endothelium of blood vessels into ameboid elements.
18) It is certain that this phenomenon is not flue to active phagocytosis, and that it is not connected with ameboid movement and formation of pseudopodia.
Special attention was paid to the presumed loosening of the connection between the endothelial cells and their isolation and transformation into ameboid elements.
In some cases exceptionally large free ameboid cells with a pale nucleus, a wrinkled membrane and a large amount of fine and coarse carbon particles, completely filling the protoplasm, can be found in the lumen of the enlarged vessels (Fig.
Rounding off, formation of ameboid pseudopodia and transformation into wandering cells could never be detected.
They are rounding off and display ameboid pseudopodia of varying form and size.
Many of the round ameboid cells are morphologically identical with common small and medium sized lymphocytes, as described in the foregoing for the blood, filling the enlarged capillaries and capillary veins.
The presence of ameboid cells alleviated Wagge's concerns over proposed mechanisms of shell repair, and led him to wonder whether similar mechanisms were also used in formation of new shell.
Regardless, he seemed quite certain that ameboid cells played an essential role in the crystallization of both shell nacre and pearls, the former stimulated by normal growth processes and the latter by the abnormal presence of a foreign object.
The findings of Dubois and Boutan were no doubt instrumental in Wagge's (1955) conclusion that migrating ameboid cells were essential contributors to shell formation.