amebic

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amebic

 [ah-me´bik]
pertaining to, caused by, or of the nature of, an ameba.
amebic dysentery a form of dysentery caused by Entamoeba histolytica and spread by contaminated food, water, and flies; it was formerly thought to be a purely tropical disease, but it is now known that many cases occur throughout the United States. It is usually less acute and virulent than bacillary dysentery, but it frequently becomes chronic. Symptoms are diarrhea, fatigue, and intestinal bleeding. Complications include involvement of the liver, liver abscess, and pulmonary abscess. For treatment several drugs are available, for example, emetine hydrochloride and chloroquine, which may be used singly or in combination. Called also intestinal amebiasis.

a·me·bic

(ă-mē'bik),
Relating to, resembling, or caused by amebas.

amebic

/ame·bic/ (ah-me´bik) pertaining to or of the nature of an ameba.

amebic

See ameba.

amebic

adjective Pertaining to
1. Amebiasis, see there.
2. Amoeba, see there.

a·me·bic

(ă-mē'bik)
Relating to, resembling, or caused by amebas.

amebic

pertaining to, caused by, or of the nature of, an ameba.

amebic dysentery
an acute amebic dysentery of humans caused by Entamoeba histolytica which rarely occurs spontaneously in dogs and cats. A similar disease of reptiles and amphibians is caused by E. invadens and E. ranarum.
amebic gill disease
caused by Paramoeba spp.; important disease in sea-caged salmonids; manifested by lethargy, flared opercula, rapid death; encouraged by high temperatures.
amebic granulomatosis
world-wide disease of goldfish; cause not definitely known; characterized by white nodules on the skin, visceral granulomata and ascites.
amebic meningoencephalitis
caused by Naegleria fowleri and is restricted in occurrence to humans.
References in periodicals archive ?
Primary amebic meningoencephalitis deaths associated with sinus irrigation using contaminated tap water.
Amebic meningoencephalitis is often underdiagnosed and may be more common than initially reported, especially among potential organ donors with rapidly fatal meningoencephalitis of uncertain etiologies.
Initially, several search engines were queried for references using the following key MESH words: free-living amebae, free-living amebic infections, primary amebic meningoencephalitis, PAM, Naegleria species, Naegleria fowleri, and climate change, specifically the impact of climate change on parasites and infectious diseases of aquatic environments.
Leptomyxid ameba, a new agent of amebic meningoencephalitis in humans and animals.
7, 8) Table 1 contrasts clinical, diagnostic laboratory, and neuroimaging features of primary amebic meningoencephalitis with the only two known causes of granulomatous amebic encephalitis, Acanthamoeba and Balamuthia mandrillaris.
To the Editor: Primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is an acute and fulminant disease caused by Naegleria fowleri, an amphizoic ameba belonging to the family Vahlkampfidae.
Primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a rare but nearly always fatal disease caused by infection with Naegleria fowleri, a thermophilic, free-living ameba found in freshwater environments (1,2).
Primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is a fatal disease caused by the thermotolerant free-living ameba Naegleria fowleri.
In early September 2002, the Georgia Division of Public Health and CDC were notified about a fatal case of primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) caused by Naegleria fowleri in a boy aged 11 years who had recently swum in a local river.
To the Editor: Naegleriafowleri, a protozoon found in hot springs and warm surface water, can cause primary amebic meningoencephalitis in humans.