amebic


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Related to amebic: amebic abscess

amebic

 [ah-me´bik]
pertaining to, caused by, or of the nature of, an ameba.
amebic dysentery a form of dysentery caused by Entamoeba histolytica and spread by contaminated food, water, and flies; it was formerly thought to be a purely tropical disease, but it is now known that many cases occur throughout the United States. It is usually less acute and virulent than bacillary dysentery, but it frequently becomes chronic. Symptoms are diarrhea, fatigue, and intestinal bleeding. Complications include involvement of the liver, liver abscess, and pulmonary abscess. For treatment several drugs are available, for example, emetine hydrochloride and chloroquine, which may be used singly or in combination. Called also intestinal amebiasis.

a·me·bic

(ă-mē'bik),
Relating to, resembling, or caused by amebas.

amebic

adjective Pertaining to
1. Amebiasis, see there.
2. Amoeba, see there.

a·me·bic

(ă-mē'bik)
Relating to, resembling, or caused by amebas.
References in periodicals archive ?
([section][section]) Naegleria fowleri typically causes isolated cases of primary amebic meningoencephalitis.
Incidence varies according to geographic regions, with amebic being the most common in Southeast Asia and Africa and bacterial (or pyogenic abscess) being the most frequent in Western countries [2].
Bernin et al., "Testosterone Increases Susceptibility to Amebic Liver Abscess in Mice and Mediates Inhibition of IFNy Secretion in Natural Killer T Cells," PLoS ONE, vol.
Amebic liver abscess is the most common extra intestinal manifestation of amoebiasis [7].
Pharmaceutical company Profounda Inc reported on Wednesday the receipt of the US Food and Drug Administration's orphan drug designation for miltefosine for the treatment of Granulomatous Amebic Encephalitis (GAE), a serious infection of the brain and spinal cord caused by the Balamuthia amoeba.
Acanthamoeba keratitis: synergy between amebic and bacterial contaminants in contact lens care systems as a prelude to infection.
Other gastrointestinal diseases, e.g., bacterial and amebic dysentery, typhoid fever, food poisoning, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, lactose intolerance, and colorectal cancer must be ruled out before diagnosis.
Clinical manifestation of amebiasis generally occurs in the form of intestinal involvement as acute or subacute colitis, with symptoms range from mild diarrhea to severe dysentery producing abdominal pain, diarrhea, and bloody stools, to fulminant amebic colitis.
fowleri sparks a brain infection called primary amebic meningoencephalitis.
Primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) is an extremely rare, progressive, and almost always fatal infection of the brain caused by Naegleria fiowleri.
The chapters on the liver address immunology, inborn errors of metabolism, hepatitis, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, alcoholic liver disease, primary sclerosing cholangitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune hepatitis, amebic liver abscess, pyogenic liver abscess, hydatid cysts, leptospirosis, cirrhosis, ascites, hepatic encephalopathy, hepatocellular carcinoma, portal hypertension, hepatorenal syndrome, drug-induced liver injury, acute liver failure, biliary atresia, liver diseases in pregnancy, liver transplantation, gallstone disease, cholangiocarcinoma, acute and chronic pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer, including information on pathogenesis, epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis, clinical features, treatment, differential diagnosis, prognosis, and other aspects.
A rare case of survival from primary amebic meningoencephalitis.