ambulate

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ambulate

(am′byŭ-lāt″) [L. ambulare, to move about]
To walk or move about freely.
ambulation (am″byŭ-lā′shŏn)
References in periodicals archive ?
Subjects practiced ambulating with the LLPS during a minimum of 12 training sessions of 30 min scheduled at the subjects' convenience.
The plan of care was to follow the Joint Camp Protocol for TKA for BID sessions with the caveat of the knee immobilizer to be worn when ambulating until quadriceps function improved enough to perform an unassisted straight leg raise.
Based on a modified Bromage score to test for motor block, no significant differences in ambulating ability were found in the three test groups of patients with single vertex presentations at term who requested an epidural.
While ambulating or transferring the resident, the CNA notes what the resident can and cannot do independently.
The labeling results from a prospective clinical study, which demonstrated that 35 percent of patients ambulating in less than five minutes and the majority ambulating within 10 minutes.
A nurse-driven mobility protocol given to the intervention group included questioning bedrest and urinary catheter orders, ambulating patients three to four times per day, and getting all patients out of bed to the chair for meals.
In a population that uses ambulation aids such as canes, documenting gait accuracy of the monitoring device on different surfaces consistent with everyday mobility would be beneficial because gait patterns often change while ambulating over outdoor surfaces, including ramps and uneven terrain [25-27].
Options considered included staying in bed and no PT intervention, doing exercise in bed, getting out of bed to the chair without doing exercise or ambulation, getting out of bed to the chair and doing exercise, getting out of bed to the chair and ambulating, and getting out of bed to the chair, ambulating and doing exercise (see Table I).
Although the patient was ambulating independently at 11 months of age, the orthosis was ineffective in controlling the progression of equinovarus, resulting in the performance of a modified Syme amputation and the use of a prosthesis.
Late sequelae of this syndrome include lymphedema, urinary incontinence, respiratory distress, difficulty ambulating, and difficulty with toileting.
On discharge, Joanna was thinking dearly and ambulating.
It is imperative that health care providers assess a patient's motor strength before ambulating and that she not ambulate without assistance, Dr.