amblyogenic

am·bly·o·gen·ic

(am'blē-ō-jen'ic),
Inducing amblyopia.
[amblyopia + -genic]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

am·bly·o·gen·ic

(am'blē-ō-jen'ik)
Inducing amblyopia
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Following these recommendations, we constructed our study to measure the prevalence of amblyopia and refractive errors as an amblyogenic factor in primary school children in Central Cairo, Egypt, which is a crowded, viable area deficient in such studies.
(8) Anisometropia is one of the leading causes of amblyopia, which is the only identifiable amblyogenic factor in 37% of cases.
Visual outcomes and amblyogenic risk factors in craniosynostotic syndromes: a review of 141 cases.
If a parent is amblyopic, prescribing for a lower error might be considered, since the child could be more susceptible to amblyogenic factors, and similarly if a parent has strabismus.
Specifically, for children aged 6 to 35 months the screening procedure consisted of an external observation and a photograph using a Medical Technology and Innovations (MTI) photoscreener (Ottar, Scott, & Holgado, 1994), a vision screening camera system for the detection of amblyogenic vision disorders.
Leonard-Martin, "Screening for amblyogenic factors using a volunteer lay network and the MTI PhotoScreener: initial results from 15,000 preschool children in a statewide effort," Ophthalmology, vol.
Early screening for amblyogenic risk factors lowers the prevalence and severity of amblyopia.
The overall sensitivity and specificity of the MTI Photoscreener (the ability to correctly identify children with any amblyogenic factor) was 83% and 68%, respectively.
Amblyopia and amblyogenic factors are the commonest target conditions for preschool vision screening and previous reports have stressed that the treatment of amblyopia is not effective after 8 years of age.
Higher order aberrations could have a bilateral amblyogenic effect in those cases where isometropia is present.
Amblyogenic anisometropia was defined as [greater than or equal to] 1.00 D spherical equivalent anisohyperopia, [greater than or equal to] 3.00 D spherical equivalent aniso-myopia, and [greater than or equal to] 1.50 D cylindrical equivalent aniso-astigmatism.
Screening programs in very young children would detect not only amblyopia itself but also other amblyogenic factors like ametropias, strabismus and visual stimulation defects, the diagnosis and treatment of which in time will prevent amblyopia and visual loss.