ambivalence


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ambivalence

 [am-biv´ah-lens]
simultaneous existence of conflicting emotions, attitudes, ideas, or wishes toward a goal, object, or person. adj., adj ambiv´alent.

am·biv·a·lence

(am-biv'ă-lens),
The coexistence of antithetical attitudes or emotions toward a given person or thing, or idea, as in the simultaneous feeling and expression of love and hate toward the same person. See: approach-avoidance conflict.
[ambi- + L. valentia, strength]

ambivalence

/am·biv·a·lence/ (am-biv´ah-lens) simultaneous existence of conflicting attitudes, emotions, ideas, or wishes toward the same object.ambiv´alent

ambivalence

[ambiv′ələns]
Etymology: L, ambo, both, valentia, strength
1 a state in which a person concomitantly experiences conflicting feelings, attitudes, drives, desires, or emotions, such as love and hate, tenderness and cruelty, pleasure and pain toward the same person, place, object, or situation. To some degree, ambivalence is normal. Treatment in severe, debilitating cases consists of psychotherapy appropriate to the underlying cause.
2 uncertainty and fluctuation caused by an inability to make a choice between opposites.
3 a continuous oscillation or fluctuation. ambivalent, adj.

ambivalence

Psychiatry
The simultaneous presence of opposing emotions, formally termed affective ambivalence; it is relatively common and seen in subconscious “love-hate” relationships with others. It is only regarded as pathological if extreme—e.g., the desire to live and die (which typifies suicidal ideation), or passive aggressive behaviour. Ambivalence may occur in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

Suicidology
A suicidal person’s wish to both/neither live and/nor die.

ambivalence

Psychiatry The coexistence of contradictory emotions, attitudes, ideas, or desires vis-á-vis a particular person, object, or situation

am·biv·a·lence

(am-biv'ă-lĕns)
The coexistence of conflicting or opposing attitudes or emotions toward a given person, thing, or idea, as in the simultaneous feeling and expression of love and hate toward the same person.
[ambi- + L. valentia, strength]
References in periodicals archive ?
H2: Narratives on organ donation that include information addressing specific fears and myths reduce attitudinal ambivalence more than narratives without this information.
Research Question 2: Does ambivalence of Chinese young people's attitude toward rich kids manifest in both their cognitive evaluation of, and their emotion toward, rich kids, or in just one of these two factors?
In short, jihadist zeal is easy to condemn, but will require multiple revolutions to stem -- revolutions that will require a lot of people in the Arab-Muslim world and West to shed their ambivalence and stop playing double games.
Results show that donors had a average ambivalence score of 3, with only 7% of the study population reporting no ambivalence during the assessment.
Drilling down into attitudes about "campus carry" legislation again reveals the ambivalence underlying those attitudes.
12-14) Thus, recognizing pregnancy ambivalence is important for family planning policy and programming efforts.
10) Many readers' ambivalence towards Laura in Rossetti's Goblin Market seems to me a case in point.
We need all nurses to move from ambivalence to advocacy because the stakes are too high to let others dictate the way you'll practice as a nurse in the future.
It is not necessary to review these theological systems except to note that they are symptoms of Incarnational ambivalence, an anxiety at the notion that Jesus did indeed exist in a fully human body.
Wong argues that his naturalistic approach, when applied to moral ambivalence, supports the denial of a single true morality and the existence of natural limits on the plurality of true moralities.
We like to think of birth as a time of great joy, but as Goldman reminds us, it can be an event regarded with, at best, ambivalence.
Our choice of this behavior is also important from a theoretical point of view, given that consumption of alcohol is associated with high levels of attitudinal ambivalence (Conner & Sparks, 2002), and this moderator clearly reduces the associations between attitude and intention-behavior (Cooke & Sheeran, 2004).