ambivalence


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ambivalence

 [am-biv´ah-lens]
simultaneous existence of conflicting emotions, attitudes, ideas, or wishes toward a goal, object, or person. adj., adj ambiv´alent.

am·biv·a·lence

(am-biv'ă-lens),
The coexistence of antithetical attitudes or emotions toward a given person or thing, or idea, as in the simultaneous feeling and expression of love and hate toward the same person. See: approach-avoidance conflict.
[ambi- + L. valentia, strength]

ambivalence

Psychiatry
The simultaneous presence of opposing emotions, formally termed affective ambivalence; it is relatively common and seen in subconscious “love-hate” relationships with others. It is only regarded as pathological if extreme—e.g., the desire to live and die (which typifies suicidal ideation), or passive aggressive behaviour. Ambivalence may occur in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

Suicidology
A suicidal person’s wish to both/neither live and/nor die.

ambivalence

Psychiatry The coexistence of contradictory emotions, attitudes, ideas, or desires vis-á-vis a particular person, object, or situation

am·biv·a·lence

(am-biv'ă-lĕns)
The coexistence of conflicting or opposing attitudes or emotions toward a given person, thing, or idea, as in the simultaneous feeling and expression of love and hate toward the same person.
[ambi- + L. valentia, strength]
References in periodicals archive ?
Attitudinal Ambivalence. Various factors may lead to conflicting information and stimuli regarding construction workers' safety attitude [28], and those factors may come from the individual level, the group level, and the organizational level.
H2: Narratives on organ donation that include information addressing specific fears and myths reduce attitudinal ambivalence more than narratives without this information.
Research Question 2: Does ambivalence of Chinese young people's attitude toward rich kids manifest in both their cognitive evaluation of, and their emotion toward, rich kids, or in just one of these two factors?
In short, jihadist zeal is easy to condemn, but will require multiple revolutions to stem -- revolutions that will require a lot of people in the Arab-Muslim world and West to shed their ambivalence and stop playing double games.
Results show that donors had a average ambivalence score of 3, with only 7% of the study population reporting no ambivalence during the assessment.
Drilling down into attitudes about "campus carry" legislation again reveals the ambivalence underlying those attitudes.
(12-14) Thus, recognizing pregnancy ambivalence is important for family planning policy and programming efforts.
Moreover, they are mutually compatible, and together they may account for many, perhaps even most, prima facie cases of moral ambivalence. Provided, however, that there is a single instance of full-fledged moral ambivalence, my argument still goes through.
We need all nurses to move from ambivalence to advocacy because the stakes are too high to let others dictate the way you'll practice as a nurse in the future.
124) notes, this was "one of the puzzles the Gnostics had to solve, and different Gnostic thinkers did so in different ways." It is not necessary to review these theological systems except to note that they are symptoms of Incarnational ambivalence, an anxiety at the notion that Jesus did indeed exist in a fully human body.
The two great themes more narrowly connected with the thesis of pluralistic relativism are moral ambivalence and naturalism.
"Ambivalence" uses the metaphor of birth to talk about work and the choices we make in our lives.