ambivalence


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ambivalence

 [am-biv´ah-lens]
simultaneous existence of conflicting emotions, attitudes, ideas, or wishes toward a goal, object, or person. adj., adj ambiv´alent.

am·biv·a·lence

(am-biv'ă-lens),
The coexistence of antithetical attitudes or emotions toward a given person or thing, or idea, as in the simultaneous feeling and expression of love and hate toward the same person. See: approach-avoidance conflict.
[ambi- + L. valentia, strength]

ambivalence

/am·biv·a·lence/ (am-biv´ah-lens) simultaneous existence of conflicting attitudes, emotions, ideas, or wishes toward the same object.ambiv´alent

ambivalence

[ambiv′ələns]
Etymology: L, ambo, both, valentia, strength
1 a state in which a person concomitantly experiences conflicting feelings, attitudes, drives, desires, or emotions, such as love and hate, tenderness and cruelty, pleasure and pain toward the same person, place, object, or situation. To some degree, ambivalence is normal. Treatment in severe, debilitating cases consists of psychotherapy appropriate to the underlying cause.
2 uncertainty and fluctuation caused by an inability to make a choice between opposites.
3 a continuous oscillation or fluctuation. ambivalent, adj.

ambivalence

Psychiatry
The simultaneous presence of opposing emotions, formally termed affective ambivalence; it is relatively common and seen in subconscious “love-hate” relationships with others. It is only regarded as pathological if extreme—e.g., the desire to live and die (which typifies suicidal ideation), or passive aggressive behaviour. Ambivalence may occur in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

Suicidology
A suicidal person’s wish to both/neither live and/nor die.

ambivalence

Psychiatry The coexistence of contradictory emotions, attitudes, ideas, or desires vis-á-vis a particular person, object, or situation

am·biv·a·lence

(am-biv'ă-lĕns)
The coexistence of conflicting or opposing attitudes or emotions toward a given person, thing, or idea, as in the simultaneous feeling and expression of love and hate toward the same person.
[ambi- + L. valentia, strength]
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the most fundamental phenomena in Quebec electoral politics during the last thirty-five years is the presence of political ambivalence which is prevailing among many voters towards the Parti Quebecois.
Whatever ambivalence she may feel, she keeps to herself.
From there, the Cantrils judged people's ambivalence based on how many of the 10 government activities that respondents believe should have current-level or increased funding.
In the context of organ donation, individuals' attitudinal ambivalence is often affective and grounded in specific fears, such as not receiving adequate medical support, brain death not actually meaning death, or illegal organ trade (Cohen, 2010; Morgan et al.
Research Question 1: Does ambivalence exist in the attitude of young people in China toward rich kids?
Ambivalence runs through Washington's ties with Saudi Arabia.
Medical evidence suggests that among living organ donors the prevalence of ambivalence is between 5% and 15%, with the ambivalence being so severe that up to 15% of individuals are not able to become donors.
The evidence of Texans' ambivalence is a Lone Star variation on the national theme.
The Government of India must shed its ambivalence towards terrorism.
She explains that "it is the failure to recognize that most ambivalence springs from conflicts between the child's and the mother's needs, both legitimate, that explains much of the social and cultural condemnation of 'imperfect mothers.
CONTEXT: Most studies on pregnancy ambivalence are based on data from women and depend on the women's perceptions To measure their partner's pregnancy intentions.
15) Ambivalence exists; in other words, some things are such that an agent is disposed to have both positive and negative moral sentiments towards them upon careful reflection, i.