ambivalence

(redirected from ambivalance)
Also found in: Dictionary.

ambivalence

 [am-biv´ah-lens]
simultaneous existence of conflicting emotions, attitudes, ideas, or wishes toward a goal, object, or person. adj., adj ambiv´alent.

am·biv·a·lence

(am-biv'ă-lens),
The coexistence of antithetical attitudes or emotions toward a given person or thing, or idea, as in the simultaneous feeling and expression of love and hate toward the same person. See: approach-avoidance conflict.
[ambi- + L. valentia, strength]

ambivalence

Psychiatry
The simultaneous presence of opposing emotions, formally termed affective ambivalence; it is relatively common and seen in subconscious “love-hate” relationships with others. It is only regarded as pathological if extreme—e.g., the desire to live and die (which typifies suicidal ideation), or passive aggressive behaviour. Ambivalence may occur in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

Suicidology
A suicidal person’s wish to both/neither live and/nor die.

ambivalence

Psychiatry The coexistence of contradictory emotions, attitudes, ideas, or desires vis-á-vis a particular person, object, or situation

am·biv·a·lence

(am-biv'ă-lĕns)
The coexistence of conflicting or opposing attitudes or emotions toward a given person, thing, or idea, as in the simultaneous feeling and expression of love and hate toward the same person.
[ambi- + L. valentia, strength]
References in periodicals archive ?
(129) Homi Bhabha, "Of Mimicry and Man: The Ambivalance of Colonial Discourse", October, Cilt 28, 1984, s.125-133.
Ambivalance and supplementarity have a strong presence in this book, as the author continually discovers precedents for reading declared or apparent hedonism as a virtual replication of the rhetoric of restraint.
(7.) For discussions of differing cultural styles within the black community, see Lure and Loathing: Essays on Race, Identity, and the Ambivalance of Assimilation (Gerald Early ed., 1993) (containing essays by black intellectuals and writers on black people's struggle between nationalistic and assimilationist models of collective identity); Jerome McCristal Culp, Jr., The Michael Jackson Pill: Equality, Race, and Culture, 92 Mich.
(22) In a 1947 case, for example, this ambivalance toward city-pair competition (among trunk carriers) was clear, as the examiner sought to distinguish "between the cut-throat, disruptive type of competition where the existing carrier is fighting for financial survival and the constructive kind of competitive service imposed to stimulate traffic, reduce costs, encourage better service, and otherwise promote the development of the industry"; see Civil Aeronautics Board, Docket No.
A different moral vision would see in fetal tissue transplantation a problematic conceptual and linguistic amalgamation of transplantation and abortion that renews ambivalance about the legitimacy of society's claims on cadavers, magnifies moral tensions found in prior fetal research debates, and accents widespread concerns about the casual use of elective abortion as a primary means of family planning.
Starting from Coleridge's remarks in a letter to Thomas Poole about the lover's death in "A Slumber Did My Spirit Seal" ("whether it had any reality, I cannot say.--Most probably, in some gloomier moment [Wordsworth] had fancied the moment in which his Sister might die"), Matlak goes on to unpack the emotional ambivalances embedded in the tone of this speculation, linking them with Coleridge's sonnet "Composed on a Journey Homeward" and "the daring risk in its manner of stating what is being hoped for and feared" at the same time (his infant son's death).
It is a moment of powerfully charged ambivalances: pathetic that Steffie has had to express her fears this way, but amazing that she does; awe-inspiring what strange psychic trails she had to follow to make her deepest fears heard, equally wondrous that on some level, they are heard.(13)