amaurosis

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amaurosis

 [am″aw-ro´sis]
loss of sight without apparent lesion of the eye, as from disease of the optic nerve, spine, or brain.
amaurosis conge´nita (amaurosis congenita of Leber) (congenital amaurosis) hereditary blindness occurring at or shortly after birth, associated with an atypical form of diffuse pigmentation and commonly with optic atrophy and attenuation of the retinal vessels.
amaurosis fu´gax sudden temporary or fleeting blindness.
Leber's congenital amaurosis amaurosis congenita.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

am·au·ro·sis

(am-aw-rō'sis),
Blindness, especially that occurring without apparent change in the eye itself, as from a brain lesion.
[G. amauros, dark, obscure, + -osis, condition]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

amaurosis

(ăm′ô-rō′sĭs)
n.
Total loss of vision, especially when occurring without pathological changes to the eye.

am′au·rot′ic (-rŏt′ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

amaurosis

Blindness, see there.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

am·au·ro·sis

(am'aw-rō'sis)
Blindness, especially that form occurring without apparent change in the eye itself, as from a brain lesion.
[G. amauros, dark, obscure, + -osis, condition]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

amaurosis

An old-fashioned term for blindness. From the Greek amaurois , dark or obscure. See also AMAUROSIS FUGAX.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

amaurosis 

1. Partial or total loss of sight due to a lesion somewhere in the visual pathway (usually the optic nerve), but not in the eye itself.
2. Synonym for blindness.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann