amalgamator


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

a·mal·ga·ma·tor

(ă-mal'gă-mā-tŏr),
A device for combining mercury with a metal or an alloy to form a new alloy.

amalgamate

(ă-mal′gă-māt″)
To combine mercury with silver, tin, and copper to produce amalgam.
amalgamation (-mā′shŏn) amalgamator (-māt″ŏr)

a·mal·ga·ma·tor

(ă-mal'gă-mā-tŏr)
A device for combining mercury with a metal or an alloy to form a new alloy.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Harris, "From Abolitionist Amalgamators to "Rulers of the Five Points": The Discourse of Interracial Sex and Reform in Antebellum New York City," in Hodes ed., Sex, Love, Race: Crossing Boundaries in North American History (1999): 191-212.
* 1,344 mercury amalgamators as well as 1,686 cyanide leaching pads
Some published studies have presented risky levels of noise in the working environment of medical professionals.2 The common type of exposures in clinics include high-speed turbine hand-pieces low-speed hand-pieces ultrasonic scalers amalgamators vibrators model trimmers and
Smits, "'Squaw Men,' 'Half-Breeds,' and Amalgamators: Late Nineteenth-Century Anglo-American Attitudes toward Indian-White Race-Mixing," in American Indian Culture and Research Journal 15, no.
Riggs to John Eaton, August 27, 1877, quoted in Smits, "'Squaw Men,' 'Half-Breeds,' and Amalgamators," 46.
See Perdue, 'Mixed-Blood' Indians; Smits, "'Squaw Men,' 'Half-Breeds,' and Amalgamators"; and William T.
Equipment" most members reported the purchase of "small equipment" such as amalgamators, curing lights, autoclaves, vibrators, burs handpieces, etc.; many listed "X-Ray Machines, computers, dental chairs," and other larger, more expensive items.
`"Squaw-Men,' `Half-Breeds,' and Amalgamators: Late Nineteenth-Century Anglo-American Attitudes Toward Indian-White Race-Mixing." American Indian Culture and Research Journal 15:3 (1991): 29-61.
On the Comstock Lode in Nevada, the ore pulp was heated by steam in the "pan" amalgamators and mechanical agitation was applied to replace the mules.
For social attitudes, see David Smits, "'Squaw Men', 'Half-Breeds,' and Amalgamators: Late Nineteenth-Century Anglo-American A ttitudes Toward Indian-White Race-Mixing," American Indian Culture and Research Journal 15, no.