amalgam


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amalgam

 [ah-mal´gam]
an alloy of mercury with other metals; used in dental restorations.
 Varnish, liner, and base applications for use with dental amalgam that is not bonded to the cavity preparation walls. E, enamel; D, dentin. From Darby and Walsh, 1995.

a·mal·gam

(ă-mal'gam),
An alloy of an element or a metal with mercury. In dentistry, primarily of two types: silver-tin alloy, containing small amounts of copper, zinc and perhaps other metal;, and a second type containing more copper (12%-30% by weight); amalgams are used in restoring teeth and making dies.
[G. malagma, a soft mass]

amalgam

(ə-măl′gəm)
n.
Any of various alloys of mercury with other metals, especially:
a. An alloy of mercury and silver used in dental fillings.
b. An alloy of mercury and tin used in silvering mirrors.

amalgam

Dental amalgam Dentistry A silver-copper-tin alloy with varying amounts of mercury to fill carious teeth. See Biological dentistry, Cremation, Fluoridation, Mercury.

a·mal·gam

(ă-mal'găm)
An alloy of an element or a metal with mercury. In dentistry, primarily of two types: silver-tin alloy, containing small amounts of copper, zinc, and perhaps other metals, and a second type containing more copper (12-30% by weight); they are used in restoring teeth.
[G. malagma, a soft mass]

amalgam

A dental material consisting of powdered mercury, silver and tin which, when mixed, may be forced into a drilled and cleaned cavity in a tooth where it hardens within a few minutes. Surprisingly, in spite of occasional expressed concern, amalgam does not seem to present the risk of mercury poisoning.

Amalgam

A mixture (alloy) of silver and several other metals, used by dentists to make fillings for cavities.
Mentioned in: Tooth Decay

a·mal·gam

(ă-mal'găm)
An alloy of an element or a metal with mercury. In dentistry, primarily of two types: silver-tin alloy, containing small amounts of copper, zinc, and perhaps other metal, and a second type containing more copper (12-30% by weight); amalgams are used in restoring teeth and making dies.
Synonym(s): amalgam alloy, dental amalgam alloy.
[G. malagma, a soft mass]
References in periodicals archive ?
Cracks and fractures - although all teeth expand and contract in the presence of hot and cold liquids, which ultimately can cause the tooth to crack or fracture, amalgam material - in comparison with other filling materials - may experience a wider degree of expansion and contraction and lead to a higher incidence of cracks and fractures.
The multiple logistic regression confirmed that the number of amalgam dental fillings was predictor of RLS independently of age and gender:
Resin composite masking is said to give increased shear bond strength with standard deviation of 15.54/6.41 with sandblasting of amalgam surface.
While practically more durable and more aesthetically pleasing than silver-coloured mercury amalgams, composites are usually slightly more expensive but are health-friendly.
Chi-square tests and logistic regression analyses were used to assess whether replacements are associated with factors such as age, risk of caries (high, moderate, or low), and material used (amalgam vs composite).
The aim of the present investigation is to study the effect of (ZrO2) addition on properties of high copper dental amalgam like (thermal conductivity, compressive strength, creep, and hardness and corrosion resistance)
The masters of scale modeling since 1985, the Amalgam Collection have been recognized as the industry standard by leading designers, engineers, drivers and principals within Formula 1.
Most publications concerning dental amalgam and symptoms of Hg contamination are related to people possessing amalgam restorations (DeRouen et al., 2006; Guzzi et al., 2006).
Under terms of the transaction agreement, the company, which is headquartered in Bristol, UK, will be renamed The Amalgam Collection Ltd.
Solmetex has been the leader in the dental industry in amalgam separators for over 15 years, with a focus on keeping dentists compliant with the ever-changing regulatory environment.
Some countries, such as Norway and Sweden, have responded to the growing body of scientific research on mercury amalgam toxicity by banning amalgam use.
Amalgam fillings are 50 per cent mercury a major neurotoxin and its continuous use is not justified as alternatives are now affordable effective and available in Asia.