alveolar pressure


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alveolar pressure

Air pressure in the alveoli and bronchial tree. When this pressure is positive, it is higher than atmospheric pressure; when negative, less. Gases flow from higher to lower pressures: when alveolar pressures are higher than atmospheric pressure, respiratory gases tend to be exhaled. When alveolar pressures are less than atmospheric pressures, gas flows into the lungs. Synonym: intrapulmonic pressure
See also: pressure
References in periodicals archive ?
An assumption was made that during the short interruption (100 ms), the alveolar pressure (Palv) has a constant value of 500 Pa.
However, while ETT dimensions may vary between patients, the ABMps remains capable of estimating this pressure drop so that an accurate estimation of the pressure drop in the deep bronchial paths can be used for predicting the alveolar pressure drop.
This was done under the assumption that during the transient interruption of airflow, mouth pressure equilibrates with alveolar pressure. The mouth pressure can then be substituted in the calculation for transpulmonary pressure as follows: Expiratory Resistance ([R.sub.exp]) = Mouth (Transpulmonary) Pressure / Expired Flow Rate.
This ventilatory strategy is generally implemented when the plateau pressure (alveolar pressure) climbs to potentially dangerous levels.
PPLAT faithfully approximates alveolar pressure and as such is a very useful clinical assessment tool.
If one considers what the interstitial pressure is during negative and positive pressure ventilation, the inescapable conclusion is that for the same lung volume, it must be higher under controlled conditions, even when end expiratory alveolar pressure is the same or PEEP is not used.