alveolar mucosa


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mucosa

 [mu-ko´sah] (L.)
mucous membrane. adj., adj muco´sal.
alveolar mucosa the mucosal lining of the dental alveoli; a thin, soft, fragile continuation of the mucous membrane of the cheek, lips, and floor of the mouth.

al·ve·o·lar mu·co·sa

the mucous membrane apical to the attached gingiva.

alveolar mucosa

A thin, nonkeratinized mucosal layer covering the alveolar process of maxillae and mandible and loosely attached to underlying bone. It is continuous with the mucosa of the cheek, lips, tongue, and palate.
See also: mucosa

al·ve·o·lar mu·co·sa

(al-vēŏ-lăr myū-kōsă)
Mucous membrane apical to attached gingiva.
References in periodicals archive ?
[sup][1] Moreover, the deformation can produce compressive strains, which can result in denture-induced irritations in the alveolar mucosa; occasionally it may even cause resorption in the alveolar bone.
(21) In addition, neurofibromas associated with neurofibromatosis type I are most frequently found in the tongue, but have also been identified in the gingiva, the alveolar mucosa, the palate, the buccal mucosa, the lip, the floor of the mouth, and the buccal mucosa.
These ICD-10 codes designated to the topographical site are C02.0 (Dorsal surface of tongue), C03.0 (upper gums/ alveolar mucosa), C03.1 (lower gums/ alveolar mucosa), C04 (floor of mouth), C00.4 (Inner aspect of mucosa of lower lip), C05.0 (hard palate) and C06.0 (buccal mucosa).
(7) It presents as a painless pedunculated or sessile mass on gingiva or alveolar mucosa measuring usually not exceeding 3 cm.
Clinically, a large growth of 1.5 x 2 cm, present on right maxillary alveolar mucosa, involving the marginal, attached and interdental gingiva in relation to maxillary canine and premolars extending to the palatal mucosa.
The anatomical structures of the maxilla that were considered as important in CD prognosis included; residual alveolar ridge height and width, hard palate depth, arch form, arch size, soft palate / throat morphology, median palatal fissure, border tissue attachment levels, alveolar mucosa, maxillary tuberosities and tori.
Schwannoma occurring in vestibular mucosa, alveolar mucosa have been reported but those of buccal mucosa are rarely reported.
Intra orally the swelling had the same color as the normal mucosa and involved the alveolar mucosa from the left central incisor to the 1st left molar.
Most common sites for dislodged fractured tooth fragments are upper lip, lower lip, tongue or alveolar mucosa.7 The present case report represents spontaneous emergence of tooth fragment after 8 months of trauma which goes un-noticed during emergency treatment.
Peripheral ossifying fibroma presents as a painless, hemorrhagic and often lobulated mass of the gingiva or alveolar mucosa sometimes presenting with large areas of surface ulceration.
A pedicle flap of gingiva can be raised from an edentulous ridge, adjacent teeth,or from existing gingiva on the tooth and moved laterally or coronally to replace alveolar mucosa as marginal tissues.
(Fig: 3,4,5,6) In frenotomy, the attachment to the gingiva and periosteum is severed and the insertion of the frenum is relocated upto the alveolar mucosa Frenotomy may be indicated in the mandible when a marked frenum attaches within thin gingiva and there is risk of development of labial recession.