alveolar crest


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crest

 [krest]
a projection, or projecting structure or ridge, especially one surmounting a bone or its border.
alveolar crest alveolar ridge.
ampullar crest (ampullary crest) the most prominent part of a localized thickening of the membrane that lines the ampullae of the semicircular ducts, covered with neuroepithelium containing endings of the vestibular nerve.
dental crest the maxillary ridge passing along the alveolar processes of the fetal maxillary bones.
iliac crest the thickened, expanded upper border of the ilium.

al·ve·o·lar crest

1. the portion of the alveolar bone extending beyond the periphery of the socket, lying interproximally;
2. the top of the residual alveolar bone.

alveolar crest

The most coronal portion of the bone surrounding the tooth; the continuous upper ridge of bone of the alveolar process, which is usually the first bone lost as a result of periodontal disease.
See also: crest

al·ve·o·lar crest

(al-vēŏ-lăr krest)
1. Portion of alveolar bone (i.e., coronal portion) extending beyond periphery of socket, lying interproximally.
2. Top of residual alveolar bone.
References in periodicals archive ?
The relative sinus floor position from alveolar crest and the location of mental foramen from the ridge can help in implant length selection.
Following primary debridement AP flaws and alveolar crest deformities can be seen in patients with maxillary AP fractures.
Correlational statistics compared three variables (the length of the tongue stud, the diameter of the tongue stud ball, and the length of time that the tongue stud had been worn) to presence of osseous abnormalities inferior to the alveolar crest.
Additionally, a one-tailed t test was conducted to compare the experimental group and the control group for evidence of osseous deformities unrelated to periodontal disease as evidenced by radiolucent areas in the alveolar bone inferior to the alveolar crest, t 44 = 1.
Oxidized rough surface, smooth mid implant body,wider neck at the alveolar crest.
These studies appear to reveal that careful, controlled use of the electrosurgery within accepted clinical guidelines for time of exposure and energy production may elicit minor cellular changes at the alveolar crest, but this reaction is not of clinical significance.
Measurements made from the dentogingival components of 287 individual teeth from 30 autopsy specimens established that there is a definite proportional relationship between the alveolar crest, the connective tissue attachment, the epithelial attachment, and the sulcus depth.
Parma-Benfenati et al (1986) also observed approximately 5 mm of osseous resorption when restorative margins were placed at the alveolar crest in beagle dogs.
Ingber et al (1977) suggested that a minimum of 3 mm was required from the restorative margin to the alveolar crest to permit adequate healing and restoration of the tooth.
These results gave rise to the concept of a "biologic width" and various authors have shown that a definite dimensional relation exists among the alveolar crest, supraalveolar connective tissue attachment, and junctional epithelium.
Bray (1976), has found a high correlation between the pretreatment existence of "notching" of the interseptal alveolar crest and the relapse of the orthodontically treated maxillary midline diastemas.
The vertical cut lines were made 1-2 mm apical to the alveolar crests of the canine to the horizontal cut lines on the buccal and lingual sides.