aluminum


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to aluminum: aluminum hydroxide, Aluminum alloys

aluminum

 (Al) [ah-loo´mĭ-num]
a chemical element, atomic number 13, atomic weight 26.982. (See Appendix 6.) It occurs naturally in many foods in low concentrations and is also present in many pharmaceuticals and drinking water. High levels in the body can be toxic; see aluminum poisoning.
aluminum acetate solution Burow's solution.
basic aluminum carbonate gel an aluminum hydroxide–aluminum carbonate gel, used as an antacid, for treatment of hyperphosphatemia in renal insufficiency, and to prevent phosphate urinary calculi.
aluminum chloride a topical astringent solution and antiperspirant.
aluminum chlorohydrate an antiperspirant; called also aluminum hydroxychloride.
aluminum hydroxide the hydroxide of aluminum, used as an antacid and phosphate binder; the official preparation is aluminum hydroxide gel.
aluminum hydroxide gel a preparation of aluminum hydroxide in suspension or dried form, used as an antacid in the treatment of peptic ulcer and gastric hyperacidity and as a phosphate binder in treatment of phosphate nephrolithiasis.
aluminum hydroxychloride aluminum chlorohydrate.
aluminum oxide Al2O3, occurring naturally as various minerals; used in the production of abrasives, refractories, ceramics, catalysts, to strengthen dental ceramics, and in chromatography.
aluminum phosphate gel a water suspension of aluminum phosphate and some flavoring agents; used as a gastric antacid, astringent, and soothing agent.
aluminum poisoning the toxic effects of high levels of aluminum or its compounds in the body. In the gastrointestinal tract aluminum inhibits absorption of electrolytes; inhalation of aluminum fumes may cause pulmonary fibrosis; and aluminum in the bloodstream may lead to serious neurological symptoms, such as in dialysis encephalopathy.
aluminum silicate the silicate salt of aluminum, found in nature in several different hydrated forms that have pharmaceutical or dental uses; see attapulgite, fuller's earth, and kaolin.
aluminum subacetate a compound used as an astringent, diluted with water.
aluminum sulfate a compound used as an astringent solution and antiperspirant.

a·lu·mi·num (Al),

(ă-lū'min-ŭm), Although this element is called aluminium throughout the rest of the world, the spelling aluminum was officially adopted for the U.S. by the American Chemical Society in 1925.
A white, silvery metal of very light weight; atomic no. 13, atomic wt. 26.981539. Many salts and compounds of aluminum are used in medicine and dentistry.
[L. alumen, alum]

aluminium

A metallic element (atomic number 13; atomic weight 26.98) which may cause low levels of intoxication.

Toxicology
Changes of aluminium toxicity include vitamin D-refractory osteodystrophy with impaired mineralisation, decreased bone formation, hypercalcaemia, anaemia, progressive encephalopathy, dementia (the data on aluminium and dementia are controversial).
 
Management
Chelation with deferroxamine.

aluminum

Aluminium A metallic element–atomic number 13; atomic weight 26.98 Toxicology Changes of aluminum toxicity include vitamin D-refractory osteodystrophy with ↓ mineralization, ↓ bone formation, hypercalcemia, anemia, progressive encephalopathy, dementia Management Chelation with deferroxamine

a·lu·mi·num

(Al) (ă-lū'min-ŭm)
A white silvery metal of very light weight; atomic no. 13, atomic wt. 26.981539. Many salts and compounds are used in medicine and dentistry.
[L. alumen, alum]

a·lu·mi·num

(ă-lū'min-ŭm)
Light, white, silvery metal widely used in dentistry and other branches of health care.
[L. alumen, alum]
References in periodicals archive ?
Results indicated that at elevated temperature and even a nominal composition of flux amount lead to good recovery of aluminum after the recycling of cans.
timing of aluminum toxicity responses has been improved by the
roots faced with environmentally feasible aluminum concentrations.
to 2 hours of aluminum exposure, has suggested different response
In the root cap cells, Golgi bodies are sensitive to aluminum.
Structural modifications after exposure to aluminum include a lower
functions of the cap cells, and aluminum is known to affect [Ca.sup.2+]
As for the more recent run up in aluminum prices, Vasquez says they are being influenced by a significant speculative play.
A sense of general uncertainty seems to be the rule when it comes to aluminum (as well as a number of other nonferrous commodities).
A more moderate outlook is the opinion that primary aluminum markets will be in balance through this year.
shipments implies a drop in primary aluminum demand of 5 percent.
Davenport has increased its projection for global aluminum production and now has it climbing by 6.5 percent this year versus its previously forecasted growth of 5.6 percent.