altruism

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altruism

(al′troo-ĭz-ĭm) [Fr. altruisme]
Acting for the benefit of others regardless of the consequences for oneself.

involuntary altruism

An action that is taken on behalf of others not because of one's own choosing but because of coercion, fiat, or legislation.
altruist (al′troo-ist″) altruistic (al″troo-is′tik)

altruism

Behaviour manifesting unselfish concern for the advantage of others. Much seemingly altruistic behaviour can be shown, on analysis, not to be so, and there are those who hold that altruism is a myth. Most social scientists, however, accept the concept.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hashemi [21] has also considered the developing of these symbols by building of commemorative places of martyrs at important and main centers of cities and even in educational centers, revision in preparation of cultural and promotional posters, reliefs, and space- buildings (graffiti) throughout the cities by cooperation with municipalities and even in populated villages with focus on religious and cognitive awareness aspects from the martyrs, and preservation of some part of the remained works from holy defense, naming streets and plazas and schools and universities under titles of martyrs and altruist war veterans; of course, by taking the sociological and psychological aspects of promotion.
In September 2006, the anonymous altruist gave $2,000 to the Komen Evansville Race for the Cure; several months earlier he had conferred $2,500 upon the Visiting Nurse Association Hospice via the newspaper's office.
Though "open" doesn't always mean "free," open access projects do tend to bring out the altruist in librarians.
(3) However, an altruist, who cares about the total utility of a group of homogeneous recipients, would prefer to equalize the marginal utility of food across recipients.
As Sober and Wilson put it, "An organism need not have a mind for it to be an evolutionary altruist."
Fixed Effects Tobit Regression Estimating the Amount Contributed in the Public Goods Experiment, by Subject Type Variable Egoist Model (SE) Altruist Model (SE) Intercept -2.856 2.678 *** (1.096) Age -0.033 0.050 *** (0.018) Education 1.276 0.171 Missing family members -3.999 ** (1.911) -1.359 *** (0.462) Predicted amount received 0.724 *** (0.262) 0.050 N 83 245 [R.sup.2] -148.00 -565.41 * p < 0.10.
The question of whether any human action can ever be considered truly altruistic will probably never be resolved, but it is nevertheless possible to make a meaningful distinction between other-regarding actions intended to benefit others (but that may also bring a warm-glow benefit to the "altruist") and self-regarding actions taken without (or with minimal) consideration of their impact on others.
Wilson showed that altruist organisms survive through reproduction in favor of their altruist genes and when their strategy does not favor survival, non-altruists predominate.
Becker's altruist and the negotiation models that followed can actually help to refocus attention on women's agency and the "carrots and sticks" that make a gendered division of labor persist, even within the framework of a dual-earner family.
Richard Alexander acknowledges the existence of true altruism, but insists that when it appears, it is always "an evolutionary mistake for the individual showing it." (14) But some biologists do admit that "empathy and altruism often exist where the chances for any return to the altruist are nil." (15) Even Richard Dawkins has noticed a tendency in nature that confounds his selfish gene claims: "We have the power to defy the selfish genes of our birth and, if necessary, the selfish memes of our indoctrination.