altitude


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Related to altitude: altitude sickness

altitude

[al′tito̅o̅d]
Etymology: L, altitudo, height
the level of elevation of any location on earth with reference to a fixed surface point, which is usually sea level. Several types of health effects are associated with altitude extremes, including a greater intensity of ultraviolet radiation that results from a thinner atmosphere. Barometric pressure decreases as altitude increases, so there are fewer molecules of oxygen. Thus breathing becomes faster & deeper, although demands of physical effort and cellular respiration are the same as at a lower altitude. High-altitude cardiac intolerance is usually worse in people with blood or pulmonary disorders. See also altitude sickness.
Altitude: relation between decreasing barometric pressure and PO2 and levels for athletic training. Broken arrow: altitude sickness possible in the unacclimatized.

altitude

the height above sea level. As atmospheric (barometric) pressure decreases progressively with increasing altitude, from the standard 1 atmosphere at sea level, the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) decreases proportionately; the air still contains the same ∼21% of oxygen but there are fewer molecules of oxygen per unit volume. There is also a drop in temperature and humidity, but the essential problem for human life and activity is shortage of oxygen (hypoxia).

altitude,

n pertaining to any location on earth with reference to a fixed surface point, which is usually sea level. The higher the altitude, the lower the oxygen concentration and the greater the ultraviolet radiation, both of which can cause health problems.
References in periodicals archive ?
Update on high altitude cerebral edema including recent work on the eye.
The new certification exams and courses are accessible now through the Altitude University Knowledge Hub.
After acclimatization according to a set protocol they climbed to their respective posts at high altitude.
The altitude scaling test points were conducted to generate data of a full scale turbofan engine ingesting ice crystals and experiencing a loss of thrust event while operating at altitudes ranging from high to low.
In order to obtain Earth altitude data, this project offers a plugin for the Google Earth application [16], where the Earth's surface is divided into quadrangles.
In general, even for people with pre-existing conditions, high altitude sojourns should be possible, provided fundamental recommendations of acclimatization are followed [11].
However, it still may pay dividends to be at a higher altitude and accept little-to-no tailwind versus remaining at a lower altitude with a low tailwind.
This review analyses the literature related to altitude training focused on the physiological effects of training and living in moderate to high altitude, on how physiological adaptations to hypoxic environments influence performance; and on which are the most frequently protocols used to train in altitude.
The Shadin displays altitude data in 100-foot increments but connecting to a high-resolution, serial altitude encoder tightens the accuracy to 10-foot tolerance and enables a real-time, instantaneous vertical speed (IVSI) function.
AMS can progress to High Altitude Pulmonary Edema (HAPE) or High Altitude Cerebral Edema (HACE), which are potentially fatal.
2) recommended 3 to 5 days of acclimatization when performing at an altitude above 1,500 m.
Researchers say that for winter sports athletes, the altitude of the sports venue can have a significant impact on performance, requiring athletes in skill sports, such as figure skating, ski jumping and snowboarding, to retool highly technical moves to accommodate more or less air resistance.