alter

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alter

(ôl′tər)
v. al·tered, al·tering, al·ters
v.tr.
To castrate or spay (an animal, such as a cat or a dog).
v.intr.
To change or become different.

al′ter·a·bil′i·ty, al′ter·a·ble·ness n.
al′ter·a·ble adj.
al′ter·a·bly adv.

alter

verb
(1) To castrate (obsolete). 
(2) To change in any manner.

Alter

An alternate or secondary personality in a patient with DID.
References in periodicals archive ?
As she flips through the book, different styles of book altering emerge.
Besides altering pictures, most programs also allow you to create virtual photo albums that can be stored on the computer or on a Web site accessible to friends and family members.
If he is following the author of Miscellaneous Observations in altering 'it steals away' to 'it stalks away' at iii.4.136, that would put the annotation of both copies after 1752.
Recent scholarship has filled in much illustrative detail without significantly altering the outline of the story.
When beer is poured directly into the glass, C[O.sub.2] bubbles will result, or the beer's "head." By altering the flow of the beer into the glass (tilting), Pischell said, you can reduce the foam, or turbulence.
Until recently, though, scientists have focused on altering individual proteins in a test tube to learn more about the way the molecules work.
Likewise, MEHP suppresses aromatase levels without altering levels of P450scc (Lovekamp and Davis 2001).
In a method that may prove more acceptable to a reluctant public, investigators have now created herbicide-resistant corn by subtly altering one of the plant's own genes rather than by adding a new gene.
Our major finding in this study was that exposure of the adult rat to fairly low concentrations of PCBs significantly altered dialysate (extraneuronal) DA concentrations increasing DA concentrations after 3 days and decreasing DA concentrations after longer periods of exposure--without altering tissue DA concentrations.
Prenatal exposures appear capable of altering brain development-with impacts on IQ and behavior that persist at least a decade, perhaps for life.
An important mechanism for altering gene expression in response to both endogenous and exogenous signals, including toxins, is altering nuclear transcription factor activities either directly or via specific cell-signaling pathways that regulate them.