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alter

(ôl′tər)
v. al·tered, al·tering, al·ters
v.tr.
To castrate or spay (an animal, such as a cat or a dog).
v.intr.
To change or become different.

al′ter·a·bil′i·ty, al′ter·a·ble·ness n.
al′ter·a·ble adj.
al′ter·a·bly adv.

alter

verb
(1) To castrate (obsolete). 
(2) To change in any manner.

Alter

An alternate or secondary personality in a patient with DID.

alter

euphemism for castration of a male animal; sometimes used as a synonym for spay of a female. Called also cut, geld.
References in periodicals archive ?
As she flips through the book, different styles of book altering emerge.
It's not like altering the `Mona Lisa' or adding a cigarette to the `David.
Until recently, though, scientists have focused on altering individual proteins in a test tube to learn more about the way the molecules work.
Because phthalates can cross the placenta, exposure to the developing fetus during critical points in development is also a concern, especially if DEHP is altering receptor-mediated differentiation pathways.
Walker told police that he works for a business based in Florida and denied altering any of the forms, according to the police report.
1988), and most likely due to VMAT inhibition, may further contribute to reductions in de novo synthesis of DA by altering the affinity of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) for its cofactor, tetrahydrobiopterin (Cooper et al.
What I think endocrine disrupters have done is show us that they-and presumably other toxicants as well-can exert their damage by mimicking, blocking, or altering these natural signaling pathways," says McLachlan, who heads the Center for Bioenvironmental Research at Tulane and Xavier Universities in New Orleans.
ESPRIT therapeutics allow for fine genetic surgery at the RNA processing level, providing a new and very potent tool for altering many disease mechanisms.
An important mechanism for altering gene expression in response to both endogenous and exogenous signals, including toxins, is altering nuclear transcription factor activities either directly or via specific cell-signaling pathways that regulate them.
The Feral Cat Altering Program, offered by members of the California Veterinary Medical Association, was designed to reduce the number of cats roaming city streets or killed in local shelters.
The presentations discussed four major aspects of calcium channels that are relevant for understanding their roles in genetic and environmental neurologic disorders: the genetics and molecular biology of channel structure; interactions between calcium channels and intracellular signaling pathways; the effects of toxicants on calcium channel function, both through direct interactions with channel subunits and by altering intracellular signaling; and the genetics, molecular biology, and physiology of inherited disorders caused by mutations in the genes encoding calcium channel subunits or from autoimmune disorders caused by the generation of antibodies against subunits of those proteins.
Not altering your pet is a horribly irresponsible decision.