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Related to altered: Altered Mental Status

alter

(ôl′tər)
v. al·tered, al·tering, al·ters
v.tr.
To castrate or spay (an animal, such as a cat or a dog).
v.intr.
To change or become different.

al′ter·a·bil′i·ty, al′ter·a·ble·ness n.
al′ter·a·ble adj.
al′ter·a·bly adv.

alter

verb
(1) To castrate (obsolete). 
(2) To change in any manner.

Alter

An alternate or secondary personality in a patient with DID.

alter

euphemism for castration of a male animal; sometimes used as a synonym for spay of a female. Called also cut, geld.
References in periodicals archive ?
Altered books involves using mixed media such as different types of paint finish, paper work, scraps and fabric to change a book from its original form into something completely different.
The hypothesized link between the unusual experiences factor and altered states of awareness is particularly salient in light of the notion of alcohol cue-reactivity.
The altered book barely resembles what the original must have looked like.
1] is misplaced by 1 intercostal space, the morphology of the QRS complex may be altered and ventricular tachycardia could be misinterpreted as supraventricular tachycardia.
The altered males also failed to form the normal dominance hierarchy.
The healer goes into an altered state and travels, in his mind, to the place where the soul fragment is hiding, and persuades it to come back and join the rest of the person's spirit.
1998) found apoptosis and altered mitotic figures, along with gross disruption of the architecture of the developing brain, all in the absence of any gross morphologic defects in the other parts of the embryo.
Despite their intimate character, in other words, we know altered states partly through mediated ones.
Concerning admissibility, people mainly fear that digital photographs can become altered more easily than film-based images "to fabricate evidence for improper purposes.
Next, Richmond altered one of the monkeys' gene receptors--a doorway into their brain cells.
One consequence of trauma is altered immune response, resulting in an inability to fight infection.