aloe

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aloe

 [al´o]
1. a succulent plant, of the genus Aloe.
2. the dried juice of leaves of various species of Aloe, used in various dermatologic and cosmetic preparations.

al·oe

(al'ō), The genus name Aloe is pronounced al'ō-ē.
1. The dried juice from the leaves of plants of the genus Aloe (family Liliaceae), from which are derived aloin, resin, emodin, and volatile oils.
2. The dried juice from the leaves of Aloe perryi (socotrine aloes), of Aloe barbadensis (Barbados and Curaçao aloes), or of Aloe capensis (Cape aloes); used as a purgative; used topically in cosmetics where it has unproven value.

aloe

(ăl′ō)
n.
1. Any of various chiefly African plants of the genus Aloe, having rosettes of succulent, often spiny-margined leaves and long stalks bearing yellow, orange, or red tubular flowers.
2. See aloe vera.
3. aloes(used with a sing. verb)
a. A laxative drug obtained from the processed juice of certain species of aloe. Also called bitter aloes.
b. See aloeswood.

al′o·et′ic (ăl′ō-ĕt′ĭk) adj.

Aloe vera

A stemless plant of the genus Aloe (family Liliaceae), which has succulent leaves and grows in subtropical and tropical zones; aloe juice is rich in aloin, resin, emodin and volatile oils, and has a wide range of therapeutic uses.

Chinese herbal medicine
A vera is used topically for acne, athlete’s foot, burns, hemorrhoids, insect bites, premature balding, psoriasis and sunburns.

Fringe medicine
Aloe essence is said to balance and centre creative and vital life activities.
 
Herbal medicine
Aloe is used in Western herbal medicine for indications similar to that of Chinese herbal medicine.

Mainstream medicine
Aloe has been used in conventional medicine topically to manage radiation-therapy-induced burns.

Toxicity
Aloe should not be taken internally as it is a potent laxative; A vera extract has been known to be administered internally for constipation, dermatitis, gastritis, headaches, hepatitis, hypertension, hypotension, intestinal parasites and vertigo.

al·oe

(al'ō)
The dried juice from the leaves of Aloe perryi, and A. barbadensis or of A. capensis; used as a purgative and topically in cosmetics where it has unproven value.

al·oe

(al'ō)
The dried juice from the leaves of plants of the genus Aloe (family Liliaceae), from which are derived aloin, resin, emodin, and volatile oils.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the 1930s, following the increased use of X-rays and their attendant radiation burns, it was found that Aloe Vera gave relief and repaired tissue where all other medical preparations failed.
Aloe vera is a widely distributed Liliaceae plant in tropical regions and cosmetic and medicinal products are made from the mucilaginous tissue in the centre of the A.
Aloe vera known as the true aloe or medicinal aloe, is a species of succulent plant in the genus Aloe that is believed to have originated in the Sudan.
Aloe Vera is an important industrially cultivated species, from which is extracted a gel of proven pharmacological and medicinal value [12,6].
Whenever I, very clumsily, catch my hand on the hot oven, I dash out into the garden and slice away a portion of one of the lower outer leaves of the Aloe Vera.
Aloe vera is a perennial plant belonging to the family of Liliacea, which includes about 360 species and one of the few the medical plants that has maintained its popularity for long period of time (Rajasekaran et al., 2005).
For both the water-soluble vitamin C and the fat-soluble vitamin E, both Aloes had a salutary effect.
In nearly frost-free coastal areas, you canplant most aloes in full sun or partial shade.
Aloes are indigenous to South Africa and South America, but are now cultivated worldwide except in tundra, deserts and rain forests.
The Aloe gel consists of about 99% water; the residual dry mass is composed of approximately 35.5% crude fibres, 26.8% soluble saccharides, 23.6% ashes (minerals), 8.9% proteins, and 5.1% lipids [7].
Both the greenish leafy skin and inner white/colorless parenchymatous tissue (source of Aloe gel) contain a long list of bioactive compounds including amino acids, peptides, and proteins/enzymes, carbohydrates (unique mono-, di-, and polysaccharides), minerals and vitamins, and secondary metabolites belonging to the general class of anthraquinones/anthrones, chromones, phytosterols, and phenolics.
Did you know that Aloe Vera is great for your inner health as well as outer beauty?