aloe


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to aloe: Aloe vera

aloe

 [al´o]
1. a succulent plant, of the genus Aloe.
2. the dried juice of leaves of various species of Aloe, used in various dermatologic and cosmetic preparations.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

al·oe

(al'ō), The genus name Aloe is pronounced al'ō-ē.
1. The dried juice from the leaves of plants of the genus Aloe (family Liliaceae), from which are derived aloin, resin, emodin, and volatile oils.
2. The dried juice from the leaves of Aloe perryi (socotrine aloes), of Aloe barbadensis (Barbados and Curaçao aloes), or of Aloe capensis (Cape aloes); used as a purgative; used topically in cosmetics where it has unproven value.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

aloe

(ăl′ō)
n.
1. Any of various chiefly African plants of the genus Aloe, having rosettes of succulent, often spiny-margined leaves and long stalks bearing yellow, orange, or red tubular flowers.
2. See aloe vera.
3. aloes(used with a sing. verb)
a. A laxative drug obtained from the processed juice of certain species of aloe. Also called bitter aloes.
b. See aloeswood.

al′o·et′ic (ăl′ō-ĕt′ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Aloe vera

A stemless plant of the genus Aloe (family Liliaceae), which has succulent leaves and grows in subtropical and tropical zones; aloe juice is rich in aloin, resin, emodin and volatile oils, and has a wide range of therapeutic uses.

Chinese herbal medicine
A vera is used topically for acne, athlete’s foot, burns, hemorrhoids, insect bites, premature balding, psoriasis and sunburns.

Fringe medicine
Aloe essence is said to balance and centre creative and vital life activities.
 
Herbal medicine
Aloe is used in Western herbal medicine for indications similar to that of Chinese herbal medicine.

Mainstream medicine
Aloe has been used in conventional medicine topically to manage radiation-therapy-induced burns.

Toxicity
Aloe should not be taken internally as it is a potent laxative; A vera extract has been known to be administered internally for constipation, dermatitis, gastritis, headaches, hepatitis, hypertension, hypotension, intestinal parasites and vertigo.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

al·oe

(al'ō)
The dried juice from the leaves of Aloe perryi, and A. barbadensis or of A. capensis; used as a purgative and topically in cosmetics where it has unproven value.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

al·oe

(al'ō)
The dried juice from the leaves of plants of the genus Aloe (family Liliaceae), from which are derived aloin, resin, emodin, and volatile oils.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Recently published report on the Aloe Vera Extract market, found on the Wise Guy Report (WGR) website revealed a great deal about various market dynamics.
Watch behind-the-scene footage of Kim's first Nature's Way Aloe Vera advertising shoot at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DZRnpFX4sMI.
Gerishon Nzuva, who retired after serving as a senior deputy-director of agriculture, says aloe vera's many uses have remained largely unknown for years."The plant is versatile.
Aloe cures range from influenza, through irritable bowel syndrome to arthritis.
In the intervention group, in addition to routine nursing care to prevent bed sores by nurses, twice a day, pure Aloe Vera gel was rubbed on the areas of hip, sacrum and heel while placebo (gel of water and starch) were used in the control group.
The present study is a review of clinical trials on the effect of Aloe vera in preventing and healing of skin wounds.
Although bear in mind aloe Vera will put up with less sunlight than other indoor plants.
Conclusion: Taking antifungal activity of terbinafine as 100%, it was 66% with Aloe vera and 47% with Cymbopogon citratus which are considered intermediate.
The different concentrations of Aloe vera leaf extract (100 gL) were transferred into the well using a micropipette.
There is no information about the effect of Aloe vera on starvation.