ALMANAC

(redirected from almanacks)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

ALMANAC

A clinical trial of sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) versus complete axillary clearance for patients with operable early stage breast cancer; it concluded that SNLB is associated with reduced arm morbidity and better quality of life than complete axillary clearance, and is the treatment of choice for patients who have early stage breast cancer with clinically negative nodes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tornara a aparecer no Almanack Laemmert por mais tres vezes, deixando de constar na lista em 1848.
O anuario em que os anuncios foram publicados e o famoso Almanack Laemmert.
O sobrenome Balonchard desaparece dos registros do Almanack, mas na Rua da Assembleia e em suas redondezas veremos que diversos fundidores de tipo irao se estabelecer no decorrer do seculo XIX em terras cariocas.
I hope you will do a few of your small almanacks to keep hour Hand in for another year your Boys are lazy, and so indeed is mine for want of myself being among them.
Winthrop's note also points to the close connections between printing and the Atlantic World: Glover, the newly-retained English printer, died "of a fever" on the voyage from London (leaving scholars to debate who operated the press in his absence), and the title of the Almanack Calculated for New England, by Mr Peirce, Mariner, advertised the nautical connections of its author.
By the birth of the United States, Robert Bailey Thomas's Farmer's Almanack sold 100,000 copies annually.
the People generally complaining that they scarcely knew how the Time passed, or that they hardly knew the day of Rest, or Lords Day, when it was, for want of a Diary, or Day Book, which we call an Almanack.
1) The "old Anatomy," as Bowen's defensiveness suggests, had fallen into intellectual disrepute, although it retained some following: George Andrews felt it necessary to argue in the South Carolina Almanack and Register (1760) that only God had control over man's body.
whilst the poor peasant, who never saw a watch, will tell the time to a fraction, by the rising and setting of the moon, and some particular stars, which he learns from his almanack.