allowable error

allowable error

Allowable analytical error Statistics A systemic error that is 'acceptable', both statistically and analytically–eg, 95% limit of error. See Standard deviation.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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We have taken this sample size is based on level of precision; precision consists of allowable error. In this study 10% allowable error is considered.
The agreement was first determined graphically with a scatterplot produced with the reference method (Cobas) as the x-axis, the compared method (CardioChek) as the j-axis, cholesterol values, equality line, acceptance limits around the equality line, clinical allowable error limits around the equality line, and Passing-Ba-block regression line (Fig 1).
Predicting defects using imprecision (CV), inaccuracy (Bias) and total allowable error (TEa).
It allows one to set analytical-quality goals for imprecision, bias, and total allowable error; determine an individual's RCV for interpreting serial testing results; or set internal rules ([DELTA] check) to flag possible error in the preanalytical or analytical testing phases.
If the upper and lower bounds fall within the interval of difference created by predefined total allowable error, then the two methods of measurement can be considered equivalent.
If [e.sup.(k).sub.max] > [epsilon] and [R.sub.ij] [greater than or equal to] [bar.R] at mesh interval [S.sub.k], where e denotes maximum allowable error, the nonsmooth points exist in this mesh interval.
Table 2 shows that the iterative allowable error is smaller, and the number of corresponding iterations is higher.
Alternatively, one could apply the total allowable error to the test result to create a band of error-transformed results.
The prevalence of obesity was 10% in a study by Subramanya et al., [8] the sample size was calculated using the following formula: n = [Z.sup.2]pq/[L.sup.2], where Zis the standard normal variate for 95% confidence interval = 1.96; p is the prevalence of obesity = 0.1; q = (1 - p) = 1 - 0.1 = 0.9; L is the allowable error. Considering an absolute allowable error of 3%, n [approximately equal to] 390, and considering 15% of the study participants as nonrespondents, a total sample size of [approximately equal to]450 was calculated.
The next step is to find the Total Allowable Error (TEa) for ceramic.
As the meaningfulness level obtained (0.011) is lower than the allowable error, 5%, the second hypothesis of the research is verified.
Another comparison is offered in Figure 6, showing the estimated cumulative localization error probability of SURWSPA, URW-BP, and BP as a function of allowable error. We compare the three localization algorithms with 5 iterations, which are required to converge by URW-BP and BP.