allometry


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allometry

(ə-lŏm′ĭ-trē)
n.
1. The disproportionate growth of a part or parts of an organism as the organism changes in size.
2. The study of such growth.

al′lo·met′ric (ăl′ə-mĕt′rĭk) adj.

allometry

[əlom′itrē]
Etymology: Gk, allos + metron, measure
the measurement and study of the changes in proportions of the various parts of an organism in relation to the growth of the whole or of such changes within a series of related organisms. See also allometric growth. allometric, adj.

allometry

measurement of the changes in shape of an animal relative to increases in its size.
References in periodicals archive ?
alletteratus showed a negative allometry, In addition, the variability of morphometric as well as meristic characters of E.
Observed allometry for sacral traits in females suggested that selection may be acting on trunk, because wider pelvic girdle would increase the space available for eggs.
2005) reported isometric growth in juveniles and positive allometry in adults, and Hirose & Negreiros-Fransozo (2007) found positive growth in both juveniles and adults.
The minorant growth allometry of the length weight relation-ship for the whole population agrees with results of other studies (Table 4 and 5).
The allometry pattern for each parameter was established by testing the slope (b) of the regression equations against isometry ([H.
Growth of the cardiac measurements and fetal parameters were explored by allometry and linear regression analysis.
1999) studied allometry in wool breed lambs and found that both shoulder and hindquarter were isogonic in relation to cold carcass weight, corroborating the results obtained in this work.
Allometry and functional constraints on proboscis lengths in butterflies.
The ontogeny and adult allometry of Pseudagnostus merit study because the genus persists across a Late Cambrian extinction boundary.
The constant of allometry "b = 3" was determined for each parameter by using power function Y= axb and the equations were linearized by logarithmic transformation.
Linear regressions of RWs against log10 centroid size indicate significant allometry for all four axes (Fig.