allogamy

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al·log·a·my

(al-og'ă-mē),
Fertilization of the oocyte of one person by the sperm of another. Compare: autogamy.
[allo- + G. gamos, marriage]

allogamy

(ə-lŏg′ə-mē)
n.
2. See cross-pollination.

allogamy

The pollination from the anther of the flower of one plant to the stigma of the flower of a genetically distinct plant, which may be limited or expanded by self-incompatibility, heterostyly, dichogamy or herkogamy.

allogamy

see CROSS-FERTILIZATION.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Changes in weather patterns at coffee origins mean a general global increase in instances of these plagues, and Robustas allogamous genetics allow it to adapt to changing climates without intensive human intervention.
In allogamous plant breeding programs, it is essential to generate base populations that can be used in the future as a source of inbred lines for obtaining superior hybrids (HALLAUER et al., 2010).
Self-fertilizations are important to obtain lineages for the production of commercial hybrids in allogamous plants and for genetic studies.
Corn (Zea mays L.) is a diploid, allogamous species that belongs to the Poacea family, originated in Mexico and Central America.
Reproductive studies have revealed that a large number of plant species are allogamous or possess a mixed mating system that is predominantly allogamous (Gusson et al.
The use of molecular markers is a powerful tool in the genetic study of populations, RAPD (Random Amplifies Polymorphic DNA) being suitable for the analysis of genetic diversity in natural populations of allogamous species (Ferreira and Grattapaglia, 1998).
speltoides is considered by Hammer (1980) as typically allogamous (cross fertilized) and Ae.
It is a monoecious, wind-pollinated, and allogamous species (Schaffalistzky de Muckadell 1955; Metzeau et al.
On the diploid level a distinction will be made between autogamous and allogamous crops, the latter in several examples known as crop-weed complexes.