alliteration

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al·lit·er·a·tion

(ă-lit-er-ā'shŭn),
In psychiatry, a speech disturbance in which words commencing with the same sounds, usually consonants, are notably frequent.
[Fr. allitération, fr. L. ad, to, + littera, letter of alphabet]

alliteration

(ă-lit″ĕ-rā′shŏn) [L. alliteratio]
A speech disorder in which words beginning with the same consonant sound are used to excess.
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Like Sean Cubit, she argues that "the proliferation of video technologies multiplies the number of sites for cultural struggles." [27] Similarly, in the production of music and zines, the proliferation and "democratization" of music technologies (underground and small, local recording companies), print technologies (Kinko's et al., and the increasing availability of computers to young people in school), and Internet technologies (especially as more programs designed for the computer "alliterate" web-page creator become available, and as the cost of the technology reaches levels low enough for mass consumption), sites of political praxis are expanded.
Two key words in these statements alliterate with each other: the word for "prayer," s[check{s}][[contains].sup.[contains]], itself not all that common, and the word for "become acquainted," also s[check{s}][[contains].sup.[contains]].
Words that rhyme, tease and alliterate or smash up against each other in dissonance.
Regardless of genre, every poem is characterized by the alliteration of a certain sound, meaning that every line in it contains one or two words that begin with the same consonant or vowel; it is held that all vowels alliterate with each other, creating one sound.
Whatever happens, vowels will always appear to 'alliterate promiscuously'.
I regret that the important discussion of the principle that the first stress in each half-line must alliterate is presented in a footnote (p.
Blackwell and alliterate again - is getting upstaged by an upstart.
There are one or two alliterating letters in the first half line preceding the medial caesura; these also alliterate with the first stressed syllable in the second half line.
What inner voice told Weiss to alliterate the last five words in that series, but not the first two?
Two or more words are said to alliterate if they have the same initial sound.
Two or more words are said to alliterate if they begin with the same initial sound.
The second stressed word of that line usually does not alliterate, as the following example from Beowulf illustrates: