allelopathy


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allelopathy

A biological phenomenon in him which one organism produces secondary metabolites that have either beneficial (positive) allelopathy or detrimental (negative) allelopathy on target organisms.

Examples of organisms displaying allelopathy
Plants, algae, bacteria, coral and fungi. These interactions influence species distribution and abundance within plant communities and ecosystems.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Moringa (Moringa oleifera L.) allelopathy also has gained attention of the scientific community as it is innate source of plant growth regulators.
The relationships among allelopathy, resource competition, weed suppression, and crop yield warrant further study.
But new findings offer some of the best evidence yet that plant communities also attain ecological equilibrium by stimulating and inhibiting neighboring plants via chemicals exuded from their roots -- a phenomenon known as allelopathy.
All previously documented, autonomous, epiphyte-control strategies in marine macrophytes, other than mucilaginous outer coatings and allelopathy (Hay 1996), have involved species with intercalary meristems.
Chung, "Biological control of weeds and plant pathogens in paddy rice by exploiting plant allelopathy: an overview," Crop Protection, vol.
The few studies that examine both find a conflict between lab and field data where allelopathy in the laboratory is not always demonstrated in the field (Keever, 1950; Muller and Muller, 1956; Jameson, 1970; del Moral and Cates, 1971; Neill and Rice, 1971; Stowe, 1979).
Allelopathy is a phenomenon in which chemicals released by the invasive plant discourage growth of native plants (Heirro & Callaway, 2003).
You may remember the occasion when Messrs Beardshaw and Anderson told us all about the subject of allelopathy.
In Southeast Asia, invasive species cost at least US$ 33 billion, reducing the total GDP by 5 percent, adding that Parthenium manipulates the ecology of fields, affects yield of crops and invades forests through its aggressive nature and allelopathy (hindering development of different plants), said an official.