allelopathy

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allelopathy

A biological phenomenon in him which one organism produces secondary metabolites that have either beneficial (positive) allelopathy or detrimental (negative) allelopathy on target organisms.

Examples of organisms displaying allelopathy
Plants, algae, bacteria, coral and fungi. These interactions influence species distribution and abundance within plant communities and ecosystems.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Allelopathic substances released during the macrophytes active growth phase could inhibit algal growth.
Although the research on allelopathy in cropping systems has increased in the last two decades, the allelopathic influences of multipurpose trees on crops in the traditional agroforestry system in Garhwal Himalaya have been little investigated.
However, the efficiency of cover in weed management can be caused for different reasons, the bed seed is gradually reduced, the cover used could have any allelopathic compound that prevent the germination of other species.
Although DIBOA and DIMBOA--the compounds released by wheat--are allelopathic, their degradation products can be even more so, the researchers reported in the Feb.
The inhibition of barnyardgrass and bristly foxtail seed germination, seedling total fresh weight and root length by the extracts of the 11 winter cereals could be attributed to their allelopathic potential characteristics.
There are many reports of allelopathic effects of litter or litter extracts on various understory species, including woody plant seedlings (Rice 1984).
Leaves and fruits contain the allelopathic juglone, which means they contain substances that are toxic to some other plants.
In addition, Lake markets a series of allelopathic remedies for such conditions as yeast infection, vaginal itch, feminine odor and vaginal dryness.
The lower cotton lint yield and poorer fibre quality for cotton following grain legumes may be due to allelopathic effects of the legume stubble and seed material which remained in the field at the time of sowing cotton (Hulugalle et al.
Others have found dual antiherbivore-allelopathic roles in inducible plant metabolites (Lovett and Holt 1995), and increased allelopathic productivity under stress (Tang et al.
This is likely due to the allelopathic nature of Brassica species (Al-Khatib et al.
"And artichoke thistle is allelopathic, meaning it exudes chemicals that keep other plants from growing under its canopy, so it tends to become a mono-culture," Pryor stated.