allele


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allele

 [ah-lēl´]
one of two or more alternative forms of a gene at the same site in a chromosome, which determine alternative characters in inheritance. adj., adj allel´ic.
silent allele one that produces no detectable effect.

al·lele

(ă-lēl'), Avoid the mispronunciations al-ĕl' and al'ēl.
Any one of a series of two or more different genes that may occupy the same locus on a specific chromosome. As autosomal chromosomes are paired, each autosomal gene is represented twice in normal somatic cells. If the same allele occupies both units of the locus, the individual or cell is homozygous for this allele. If the alleles are different, the individual or cell is heterozygous for both alleles. See: DNA markers.
See also: dominance of traits.
Synonym(s): allelomorph
[G. allēlōn, reciprocally]

allele

(ə-lēl′)
n.
Any of the alternative forms of a gene or other homologous DNA sequence. Also called allelomorph.

al·le′lic (ə-lē′lĭk, ə-lĕl′ĭk) adj.
al·le′lism n.

allele

One of two or more alternate form of a gene, which results in different gene products; any one of two or more variants of a gene that occupy the same position (locus) on a chromosome, which may differ in nucleotide sequence, but not substantively in function or effect.

In eukaryotic cells, alleles exist in pairs—usually one allele is contributed by each parent. The phenotypic expression of an allele is a function of whether the gene is dominant (in which case only one allele is needed for expression) or recessive (requiring that both alleles be the same for expression of a trait). Autosomal chromosomes are paired and each locus is represented twice; the presence of identical alleles on the same locus are said to be homozygous; the presence of two different alleles on the same locus are heterozygous.

allele

Genetics An alternate form of a gene, which results in different gene products; any one of 2 or more variants of a gene that occupy the same position–locus on a chromosome, which may differ in nucleotide sequence, but not substantively in function or effect. See Amorphic allele, Pseudoallele allele, Reeler allele, Wimp allele.

al·lele

(ă-lēl')
Any one of a series of two or more different genes that may occupy the same locus on a specific chromosome. As autosomal chromosomes are paired, each autosomal gene is represented twice in normal somatic cells. If the same allele occupies both units of the locus, the individual or cell is homozygous for this allele. If the alleles are different, the individual or cell is heterozygous for both alleles.
See also: DNA markers
Synonym(s): allelomorph.
[G. allēlōn, reciprocally]

allele

Short for allelomorph.
1. Genes that occupy corresponding positions (HOMOLOGOUS loci) on homologous chromosomes. Humans have two, usually identical, alleles for each gene, one on each AUTOSOMAL chromosome of a pair.
2. One of the ways in which a gene, at a particular location on a chromosome, may differ in its DNA sequence from the normal or from its fellow at the corresponding location on the other chromosome. If different alleles of a gene occur at the corresponding sites on the pair of chromosomes the individual is said to be HETEROZYGOUS for the gene. If the two alleles are abnormal in the same way, the individual is HOMOZYGOUS and the characteristic determined by the gene defect will be present. Heterozygous individuals will show the features of the DOMINANT gene. The other allele is RECESSIVE. The term derives from the Greek allos , another.

allele

a particular form of GENE. Alleles usually occur in pairs, one on each HOMOLOGOUS CHROMOSOME in a DIPLOID cell nucleus. When both alleles are the same the individual is described as being a HOMOZYGOTE; when each allele is different the individual is a HETEROZYGOTE. The number of allelic forms of a gene can be many (MULTIPLE ALLELISM), each form having a slightly different sequence of DNA bases but with the same overall structure. Each diploid can, however, carry only two alleles at one time. See also DOMINANCE (1).

genotype

The complete genetic constitution of an individual at a particular location (locus) in the genome. At many locations (loci) throughout the genome, the chromosomal DNA sequence differs subtly between individuals. Each of the various DNA sequences at one locus is called an allele: for instance, if there are three sequence variants present, then there are three alleles. Offspring inherit one homologous chromosome from each parent. Thus, a genotype comprises two alleles: the allele inherited from the father (carried on the paternal chromosome) and the allele inherited from the mother (carried on the maternal chromosome). See gene; phenotype.

al·lele

(ă-lēl')
Any one of a series of two or more different genes that may occupy the same locus on a specific chromosome.
[G. allēlōn, reciprocally]
References in periodicals archive ?
These developments have spurred the discussions between Addgene and Allele to expand the mNeonGreen distribution to the academic community and allow mNeonGreen to truly establish itself as a fluorescent protein of standard.
Study of frequency of alleles showed that major allele (M) for SNP rs2802288 in our local population is "G", while the minor allele (m) is "A".
Peak height of SNP alleles in the sequencing map and allele frequencies which are estimated by MWsnap are shown in Table II.
Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), described as the diabetes that occurs only during the state of pregnancy, is an illness of increasing prevalence in Pakistan.13,14 It has been found to be associated with stillbirth and abnormal birth weight, which places new born babies with a higher birth weight at risk of cardiovascular disease.15 Research has demonstrated that increased Fetuin-A is related to increased GDM risk.10,16,17 One such study included anthropometric measurements of newborn to relate complications of GDM with increased Fetuin-A and TNFa, among other factors, but their effect as potential confounders was not ruled out.16 The current study was planned to assess the association of Fetuin-A levels with GDM, and to see whether AHSG rs4918 G allele acts as a risk allele for GDM.
Allele identification: Allele identification followed the method of Payne and Lawrence (1983).
When the HLA-C allele frequencies were compared between Groups I and III, an underrepresentation of the HLA-C*07 allele group was also observed for Group I (OR: 0.4192, 95% CI: 0.2246-0.7822, P = 0.005), conferring a PF of 0.1553 (Table 2).
As shown in Table 5, the HLA-B * 58:01 allele was detected as significant in the carbamazepine-induced DRESS group when compared with the carbamazepine-tolerant control group (P = 0.032; OR (95% CI) = 7.55 (1.20-47.58)).
This study was designed to focus on the genetic variant-21A/T (rs7943316) of the CAT gene and prevalence of mutant T allele frequency in healthy individuals.
Gorodeszky et al reported in 1986 (30), the first study related to HLA and MS in Mexico and found association with the HLA-A3-B7-DR15 haplotype in MS patients with strong Caucasian ancestry in central Mexico, but found no association for the HLA-DRB1*15 allele alone.
As its first priority, Allele will begin iPSC-derived cell therapy programs to treat diabetes and spinal cord injury.
The chi-square test ([chi square]) was applied to analyze the accordance with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and the differences in the distribution of alleles and genotypes.
The OR values of the two-allele polymorphism were calculated from the following two models, respectively: (1) allele model (mutant alleles versus wild-type alleles); (2) dominant model (heterozygous + homozygous mutant versus homozygous wild-type).