rhodopsin

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rhodopsin

 [ro-dop´sin]
visual purple: a photosensitive purple-red chromoprotein in the retinal rods that is bleached to visual yellow (all-transretinal) by light, thereby stimulating retinal sensory endings. Lack of rhodopsin results in night blindness. Vitamin A is the primary source of rhodopsin.

rho·dop·sin

(rō-dop'sin), [MIM*180380]
A purplish-red thermolabile protein, MW about 40,000, found in the external segments of the rods of the retina; consists of opsin combined with 11-cis retinal; it is bleached by the action of light, which converts it to opsin and all-trans-retinal, and is restored in the dark by rhodogenesis; the dominant protein in the plasma membrane of rod cells.
Synonym(s): visual purple

rhodopsin

/rho·dop·sin/ (ro-dop´sin) visual purple; a photosensitive purple-red chromoprotein in the retinal rods that is bleached to visual yellow (all-trans retinal) by light, thereby stimulating retinal sensory endings.

rhodopsin

(rō-dŏp′sĭn)
n.
Any of a class of reddish, light-sensitive pigments found in the retinal rods of the eyes of terrestrial and marine vertebrates, consisting of opsin and retinal. Also called visual purple.

rhodopsin

[rōdop′sin]
Etymology: Gk, rhodon, rose, opsis, vision
the purple pigmented compound in the rods of the retina, formed by a protein, opsin, and a derivative of vitamin A, retinal. Rhodopsin gives the outer segments of the rods a purple color and adapts the eye to low-density light. The compound breaks down when struck by light, and this chemical change triggers the conduction of nerve impulses. Brief periods of darkness allow the opsin and the retinal to reconstitute the rhodopsin, which accounts for the short delay a person experiences in adapting to sudden or drastic changes in lighting, as when moving out of bright sunlight into a darkened room or from darkness into bright light. Closing the eyes is a natural reflex that allows reconstitution of rhodopsin. Compare iodopsin. See also visual purple.

rho·dop·sin

(rō-dop'sin)
A red thermolabile protein found in the rods of the retina; it is bleached by the action of light, which converts it to opsin and all-trans-retinal, and is restored in the dark by rhodogenesis; the dominant protein in the plasma membrane of rod cells.
Synonym(s): visual purple.

rhodopsin

The retinal rod photoreceptor pigment. Also known as visual purple.

rhodopsin

a photochemical pigment found in the rods of the retina of the vertebrate eye. When bleached by absorbed light, rhodopsin dissociates into its two components - a pigment called RETINAL and a protein called OPSIN. This dissociation ultimately triggers an action potential and the production of nerve impulses in the ganglion cells leading to the optic nerve. Lack of rhodopsin causes night blindness.

rhodopsin 

Visual pigment contained in the outer segments of the rod cells of the retina and involved in scotopic vision. When light stimulates the retina, the chromophore of the pigment molecule '11-cis' retinal (which is vitamin A aldehyde) isomerizes to 'all-trans' retinal. This leads to other chemical transformations which carry on even in the absence of light. The first stage is prelumirhodopsin, then lumirhodopsin and finally metarhodopsin (of which there are two types). This last transformation may lead to the breakdown of the molecule into retinal and opsin. The molecule is regenerated by recombining retinal and opsin with some enzymes. The absorption spectrum of rhodopsin has a maximum around 498 nm. The isomerization from '11-cis' to 'all-trans' also gives rise to the process of transduction in which the membrane potential covering the pigment molecules in the outer segment changes towards a hyperpolarization of the cell. This is the first step in the nervous response to a light stimulation of the retina. Syn. visual purple (not used any more); erythropsin. See dark adaptation; bleaching; receptor potential; absorption spectrum; transduction.

rho·dop·sin

(rō-dop'sin) [MIM*180380]
A red thermolabile protein found in the rods of the retina.
Synonym(s): visual purple.

rhodopsin

visual purple: a photosensitive purple-red chromoprotein in the retinal rods that is bleached to visual yellow (all-trans-retinal) by light, thereby stimulating retinal sensory endings. Lack of rhodopsin results in night blindness. Vitamin A is the primary source of rhodopsin.
References in periodicals archive ?
In both of these configuration examples, the carbon-carbon backbone of PMVC adopts the all-trans conformations and dipole orientations are similar.
If the avoidance behavior we observed upon optogenetic activation of class IV neurons in first-instar larvae represented a photophobic response, then one would expect a stochastic distribution of larvae in both the control (ChR2 without all-trans retinal) and experimental (ChR2 with - all-trans retinal) animals, given that white and blue light have previously been demonstrated to elicit a light-induced activation of class IV da neurons that manifests in a light-avoidance response.
A novel cytochrome P450, zebrafish Cyp26D1, is involved in metabolism of all-trans retinoic acid.
Since the odd-odd nylons cannot establish the saturated hydrogen bonds between the neighboring molecular chains with the all-trans conformation, another hydrogen bonding structure must be formed.
A further aim of this study was to check whether or not the helical to all-trans conformational transition results in improved toughness.
The diffraction pattern is explained in terms of an orthorhombic unit cell containing molecules with all-trans conformation [11].