alkanet


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al·ka·net

(al'kă-net), [C.I. 75530, 75520]
The root of an herb, Alkanna, or Anchusa tinctoria (family Boraginaceae), that yields the red dyes alkannan and alkannin; used as a coloring agent; also used, combined with tannin, as an astringent.

alkanet

Herbal medicine
A biennial herb said to have antibiotic and wound-healing properties; other claims for efficacy include antidepressive, antipyretic, antitussive, astringent, diuretic, emollient and expectorant effects, and it is promoted as a blood purifier.

There is no peer-reviewed data to support alkanet’s efficacy.

al·ka·net

(al'kă-net)
Alkanna tinctoria; roots of this herb are prepared for purported value as a topical astringent.
[Sp. alcaneta]
References in periodicals archive ?
Data related to the colour fastness, colour strength (K/S) and tensile strength of alkanet dyed cotton samples with various pre and post-padding of auxiliaries are included in Tables 2 and 3 and displayed through Figs 1- 3.
Dyeing of cotton fabric with natural extracts of alkanet by twenty-five different dyeing recipes produced greenish (inclined towards grey) colour samples.
Maximum light fastness of 5 Blue Wool Standard was exhibited by alkanet dyed sample with a combination of pre- mordanting potassium dichromate; post-mordanting ferric chloride; and post-treated Albafix WFF, Dicrylan, UV-SUN and Rayosan.
Table-2: Colour fastness properties of alkanet dyed cotton fabric samples using various auxiliaries.
Cumulative colour fastness (wash, crock and light fastness) of cotton samples dyed with alkanet root extracts with the help of various dyeing auxiliaries has been displayed in Fig-2.
The data related to the colour yield or lightness (L) of cotton samples dyed with alkanet (Table-3), ranged from 46.
Table-3: Colour coordinate values (properties) of alkanet dyed cotton samples using various auxiliaries.
I learned where I could get alkanet and found it's readily available from a variety of sources, but that is only one component.
Like alkanet, it too had been used in the oil painting trade forever and it's these facets and common history that keep us on the trail of what guns were carrying around on their surface and what components can make up "alkanet oil.
Alkanet stain looks like Cabernet Sauvignon and doesn't affect wood and wood grain quite the same as a traditional stain.
Alkanet doesn't do that at all as it creates a subtle mahogany hue.
Alkanet was a pigment for thousands of years as was linseed oil.