alkalosis


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

al·ka·lo·sis

(al-kă-lō'sis), Do not confuse this word with ankylosis.
A state characterized by a decrease in the hydrogen ion concentration of arterial blood below the normal level, 40 nmol/L, or pH over 7.4. The condition may be caused by an increase in the concentration of alkaline compounds, or by a decrease in the concentration of acidic compounds or carbon dioxide.

alkalosis

(ăl′kə-lō′sĭs)
n.
1. Abnormally high alkalinity of the blood and body tissues caused by an excess of bicarbonates, as from an increase in alkali intake, or by or a deficiency of acids other than carbonic acid, as from vomiting. Also called metabolic alkalosis.
2. Abnormally high alkalinity of the blood and body tissues caused by a deficiency of carbon dioxide due to hyperventilation. Also called respiratory alkalosis.

al′ka·lot′ic (-lŏt′ĭk) adj.

alkalosis

Pathophysiology A clinical state due to either an accumulation of bases or loss of acids–↓ H+, resulting in ↑ pH. See Contraction alkalosis, Metabolic acidosis, Respiratory alkalosis. Cf Acidosis.

al·ka·lo·sis

(al-kă-lō'sis)
A state characterized by a decrease in the hydrogen ion concentration of arterial blood below the normal level, 40 nmol/L, or pH over 7.45. The condition may be caused by H-ion loss or base excess in body fluids (metabolic alkalosis), or caused by CO2 loss due to hyperventilation (respiratory alkalosis).

alkalosis

An abnormal degree of alkalinity of the blood, usually due to loss of acid by prolonged vomiting or to hysterical over-breathing with abnormal loss of carbon dioxide.

alkalosis

the state in which there is excessive body alkalinity.

Alkalosis

A condition of the blood and other body fluids in which bicarbonate levels are higher than normal.
Mentioned in: Urinalysis

al·ka·lo·sis

(al-kă-lō'sis) Do not confuse this word with ankylosis.
A state characterized by a decrease in the hydrogen ion concentration of arterial blood below the normal level, 40 nmol/L, or pH over 7.4.
References in periodicals archive ?
Regardless of cause, persistent hyperventilation in hemodialysis may have clinical relevance: the initial metabolic acidosis may be converted to a mixed metabolic and respiratory alkalosis at the end of dialysis and aggravate electrolyte imbalance predisposing to cardiac arrhythmias.
Laboratory investigations revealed hypokalaemia (2.8 Meq/L), hyponatraemia (120Meq/L) and hypochloraemia (80Meq/L) along with metabolic alkalosis. Repeated laboratory investigations revealed the same trend.
The molecular basis of inherited hypokalemic alkalosis: Bartter's and Gitelman's syndromes.
The hypothesis of this study was that a short-term supranutritional amount of VE (200 IU/kg) supplementation may mitigate impacts of HS on physiological responses, respiratory alkalosis and oxidative stress in pigs.
When interpreting the values of predialysis arterial blood gases, normal acid-base status was the most common with 43% (n=40), followed by metabolic alkalosis with chronic hydrogen ion deficiency in 19,6% (n=18), with an average nPCR of 1,03 ([+ or -]0,19) and MIS of 5 (IQR 4 - 6).
The results--which are summarized in Table 1--showed the following: low-undetectable levels of testosterone, DHEA-S, androstenedione, 17-OH-progesterone, estradiol and active renin; low-normal 24h urinary cortisol and serum aldosterone; high ACTH, progesterone, LH and FSH concentrations; metabolic alkalosis with severe hypokalemia.
Metabolic disorders including steroid-induced hyperglycemia, hypokalemia, and metabolic alkalosis can also significantly worsen general health status [2].
In conclusion, hypokalemia and metabolic alkalosis may not be found during the first year of life of Bartter syndrome patients.
Keep in mind that too much bicarbonate can create an imbalance on the opposite end of the spectrum, called metabolic alkalosis.
The distal nephron secretes K into the urine; alkalosis, a high potassium diet, and elevated Na levels in the distal tubule affect K excretion by increasing aldosterone.
Respiratory alkalosis was present in the blood gases of all patients, and initial ammonia levels were determined to be between 689 and 1575 [micro]g/dL (N: 68-136 [micro]g/dL).