alkali therapy

al·ka·li·ther·a·py

(al'kă-lī-thār'ă-pē),
Therapeutic use of alkali for local or systemic effect.

alkali therapy

The administration of an alkali (e.g., sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3)) to correct metabolic acidosis (e.g., lactic acidosis, ketoacidosis), chronic renal failure, intoxication (with organic acids, including salicylates, methanol, ethylene glycol) and massive rhabdomyolysis.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are case reports of metabolic alkalosis occurring in patients receiving alkali therapy along with SPS [1,10].
A number of studies have documented a U-shaped association between serum predialysis bicarbonate concentration and mortality rate among patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis, suggesting that overdosing alkali therapy may be hazardous [65].
Qureshi, "The use of alkali therapy in severe diabetic ketoacidosis.," Diabetes Care, vol.
Madias, "Short- and long-term effects of alkali therapy in chronic kidney disease: a systematic review," American Journal of Nephrology, vol.
Correction of metabolic acidosis with alkali therapy increases appetite, decreases protein degradation, and increases lean body mass, and is recommended when serum bicarbonate levels fall below 22 mmol/L (Kovacic, Roguljic, & Kovacic, 2003).