alkali reserve


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reserve

 [re-zerv´]
1. to hold back for future use.
2. a supply beyond that ordinarily used, for use in an emergency.
alkali reserve (alkaline reserve) see alkali reserve.
cardiac reserve an increase in cardiac output related to an increase in heart rate or stroke volume to meet body requirements.

al·ka·li re·serve

the sum total of the basic ions (mainly bicarbonates) of the blood and other body fluids that, acting as buffers, maintain the normal pH of the blood.

al·ka·li re·serve

(al'kă-lī rē-zĕrv')
The sum total of the basic ions (mainly bicarbonates) of the blood and other body fluids that, acting as buffers, maintain the normal pH of the blood.

al·ka·li re·serve

(al'kă-lī rē-zĕrv')
The sum total of the basic ions (mainly bicarbonates) of the blood and other body fluids that, acting as buffers, maintain the normal pH of the blood.

alkali

any one of a class of compounds such as sodium hydroxide that form salts with acids and soaps with fats; a base, or substance capable of neutralizing acids. Other properties include a bitter taste and the ability to turn litmus paper from red to blue. Alkalis play a vital role in maintaining the normal functioning of the body chemistry. See also acid-base balance, alkaline, base.

alkali disease
see selenium poisoning.
alkali reserve
the ability of the combined buffer systems of the blood to neutralize acid. The pH of the blood normally is slightly on the alkaline side, between 7.35 and 7.45. Since the principal buffer in the blood is bicarbonate, the alkali reserve is essentially represented by the plasma bicarbonate concentration. However, hemoglobin, phosphates and other bases also act as buffers. A lowered alkali reserve means a state of acidosis; increased reserve indicates alkalosis. Alkali reserve is measured by the combining power of carbon dioxide, which is the amount of carbon dioxide that can be bound as bicarbonate by the blood.