alimentary canal

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Related to alimentary canals: alimentary tract

alimentary

 [al″ĭ-men´tah-re]
pertaining to or caused by food or nutritive material.
alimentary canal (alimentary tract) the portion of the digestive system consisting of the organs making up the route taken by food as it passes through the body from mouth to anus; this includes the esophagus, stomach, and small and large intestines. ( and Plate 9.) Called also digestive tract.
Organs of the alimentary canal. From Applegate, 2000.

canal

 [kah-nal´]
a relatively narrow tubular passage or channel.
adductor canal Hunter's canal.
Alcock's canal a tunnel formed by a splitting of the obturator fascia, which encloses the pudendal vessels and nerve.
alimentary canal see alimentary canal.
anal canal the terminal portion of the alimentary canal, from the rectum to the anus.
atrioventricular canal the common canal connecting the primordial atrium and ventricle; it sometimes persists as a congenital anomaly.
birth canal the canal through which the fetus passes in birth.
carotid canal one in the pars petrosa of the temporal bone, transmitting the internal carotid artery to the cranial cavity.
cervical canal the part of the uterine cavity lying within the cervix.
condylar canal an occasional opening in the condylar fossa for transmission of the transverse sinus; called also posterior condyloid foramen.
canal of Corti a space between the outer and inner rods of Corti.
femoral canal the cone-shaped medial part of the femoral sheath lateral to the base of Gimbernat's ligament.
haversian canal any of the anastomosing channels of the haversian system in compact bone, containing blood and lymph vessels, and nerves.
Hunter's canal a fascial tunnel in the middle third of the medial part of the thigh, containing the femoral vessels and saphenous nerve. Called also adductor canal.
hypoglossal canal an opening in the occipital bone, transmitting the hypoglossal nerve and a branch of the posterior meningeal artery; called also anterior condyloid foramen.
infraorbital canal a small canal running obliquely through the floor of the orbit, transmitting the infraorbital vessels and nerve.
inguinal canal the oblique passage in the lower anterior abdominal wall on either side, through which passes the round ligament of the uterus in the female, and the spermatic cord in the male.
medullary canal
optic canal a passage for the optic nerve and ophthalmic artery at the apex of the orbit; called also optic foramen.
pulp canal root canal.
root canal that part of the pulp cavity extending from the pulp chamber to the apical foramen. Called also pulp canal.
sacral canal the continuation of the spinal canal through the sacrum.
Schlemm's canal venous sinus of sclera.
semicircular c's see semicircular canals.
spinal canal (vertebral canal) the canal formed by the series of vertebral foramina together, enclosing the spinal cord and meninges.
Volkmann's c's canals communicating with the haversian canals, for passage of blood vessels through bone.

di·ges·tive tract

the passage leading from the mouth to the anus through the pharynx, esophagus, stomach, and intestine.

alimentary canal

n.
The digestive tract.

di·ges·tive tract

(di-jes'tiv trakt)
The passage leading from the mouth to the anus through the pharynx, esophagus, stomach, and intestine.
Synonym(s): alimentary canal, alimentary tract.

alimentary canal

The digestive tract, extending from the mouth to the anus, in which food is converted by enzymes to a form suitable for absorption and through which the processed material passes into the bloodstream. The canal includes the PHARYNX, the OESOPHAGUS, the STOMACH and the small and large INTESTINES.

di·ges·tive tract

(di-jes'tiv trakt)
Passage from mouth to anus through pharynx, esophagus, stomach, and intestine.
Synonym(s): alimentary tract.
References in periodicals archive ?
Taxonomic occurrences within contents of alimentary canals of age-0 Rio Grande silvery minnows reared in hatchery ponds were variable, but contents were similar to those predicted for wild-caught larval conspecifics (Pease et al., 2006; Magana, 2007) and to those reported for adult conspecifics and congeners.
The alimentary canal from the esophagus to the anus was extracted.
Histological sections of three larvae, 21.5, 30.0, and 52.0 mm PSL, were cut as a preliminary aid to the location of otoliths within the cranium and to determine the histological constitution of the larval alimentary canal.
The structure of the alimentary canal and jaws changed concomitantly.
vicinus alimentary canals could be related to differences in diet.