alimentary canal


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alimentary

 [al″ĭ-men´tah-re]
pertaining to or caused by food or nutritive material.
alimentary canal (alimentary tract) the portion of the digestive system consisting of the organs making up the route taken by food as it passes through the body from mouth to anus; this includes the esophagus, stomach, and small and large intestines. ( and Plate 9.) Called also digestive tract.
Organs of the alimentary canal. From Applegate, 2000.

canal

 [kah-nal´]
a relatively narrow tubular passage or channel.
adductor canal Hunter's canal.
Alcock's canal a tunnel formed by a splitting of the obturator fascia, which encloses the pudendal vessels and nerve.
alimentary canal see alimentary canal.
anal canal the terminal portion of the alimentary canal, from the rectum to the anus.
atrioventricular canal the common canal connecting the primordial atrium and ventricle; it sometimes persists as a congenital anomaly.
birth canal the canal through which the fetus passes in birth.
carotid canal one in the pars petrosa of the temporal bone, transmitting the internal carotid artery to the cranial cavity.
cervical canal the part of the uterine cavity lying within the cervix.
condylar canal an occasional opening in the condylar fossa for transmission of the transverse sinus; called also posterior condyloid foramen.
canal of Corti a space between the outer and inner rods of Corti.
femoral canal the cone-shaped medial part of the femoral sheath lateral to the base of Gimbernat's ligament.
haversian canal any of the anastomosing channels of the haversian system in compact bone, containing blood and lymph vessels, and nerves.
Hunter's canal a fascial tunnel in the middle third of the medial part of the thigh, containing the femoral vessels and saphenous nerve. Called also adductor canal.
hypoglossal canal an opening in the occipital bone, transmitting the hypoglossal nerve and a branch of the posterior meningeal artery; called also anterior condyloid foramen.
infraorbital canal a small canal running obliquely through the floor of the orbit, transmitting the infraorbital vessels and nerve.
inguinal canal the oblique passage in the lower anterior abdominal wall on either side, through which passes the round ligament of the uterus in the female, and the spermatic cord in the male.
medullary canal
optic canal a passage for the optic nerve and ophthalmic artery at the apex of the orbit; called also optic foramen.
pulp canal root canal.
root canal that part of the pulp cavity extending from the pulp chamber to the apical foramen. Called also pulp canal.
sacral canal the continuation of the spinal canal through the sacrum.
Schlemm's canal venous sinus of sclera.
semicircular c's see semicircular canals.
spinal canal (vertebral canal) the canal formed by the series of vertebral foramina together, enclosing the spinal cord and meninges.
Volkmann's c's canals communicating with the haversian canals, for passage of blood vessels through bone.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

di·ges·tive tract

the passage leading from the mouth to the anus through the pharynx, esophagus, stomach, and intestine.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

alimentary canal

n.
The digestive tract.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

di·ges·tive tract

(di-jes'tiv trakt)
The passage leading from the mouth to the anus through the pharynx, esophagus, stomach, and intestine.
Synonym(s): alimentary canal, alimentary tract.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

alimentary canal

The digestive tract, extending from the mouth to the anus, in which food is converted by enzymes to a form suitable for absorption and through which the processed material passes into the bloodstream. The canal includes the PHARYNX, the OESOPHAGUS, the STOMACH and the small and large INTESTINES.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

di·ges·tive tract

(di-jes'tiv trakt)
Passage from mouth to anus through pharynx, esophagus, stomach, and intestine.
Synonym(s): alimentary tract.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Alimentary canal. A comparatively narrow but quite prominent swelling is visible along the inner axial surface of the external mould in the middle and posterior parts of the thorax (G in Fig.
Structure of the alimentary canal of the stick-insect, Bacillus rossii Fabr.; with a note on the parthenogenesis of this species.
Comparative anatomical and histological study of the alimentary canal of Dendroctonus frontalis (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) complex.
For example, in his paper on diverticula of the alimentary canal, published in 1910, Sir Arthur Keith could only find seven examples of colonic diverticula in the pathological museums of all the London teaching hospitals and the Hunterian Museum, of which he was curator.
Here's the strategy: your alimentary canal needs to be scoured until it's as clean as a whistle.
Although house flies have been shown to lyse bacteria within their alimentary canal, some species of bacteria persist within the fly for various periods of time.
The alimentary canal from the esophagus to the anus was extracted.
This migration to an area where the product has not even been defined Seymour refers to it as "floating up the alimentary canal" of the product development process--is what sets the company apart from its peers, according to Stephen Brittain, an engineer by background who is a strategist at Seymourpowell.
The virtual tour, enhanced by computer animation, covers the skeletal, nervous, muscular, cardiovascular, urinary, respiratory, and digestive systems, as well as the alimentary canal and the nature of the five senses.
While many of these disorders are primarily associated with organs such as the liver, pancreas and gall bladder--all of which play a crucial role in the digestive process--plenty of them are centered in the alimentary canal, the long tube leading from a cat's mouth to its anus.
The possibility of excretion is suggested because the passage rate of the digesta in the alimentary canal in goslings ranges from only 130 min to 198 min (Chen et al., 1991) and the ceca of the bird becomes almost completely empty only once every 24 hours (Mattocks, 1971; Duke et al., 1984).
The physician could not see the denture on the neck x-ray and told her that the denture had probably passed farther into her alimentary canal.